Mid Atlantic Brewing News August/September 2011 : Page 1

By The Brews Brothers (Steve Frank & Arnold Meltzer) Kim Jordan (right), founder of New Belgium Brewing, tells her many fans at this year’s SAVOR festival that her beers will be available in Virginia, Maryland and DC beginning in late August, as Brian Corrie, the Mid-Atlantic rep, looks on. PHOTO BY ALEXANDER D. MITCHELL IV N ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM By Alexander D. Mitchell IV M a arbecue! Few sum-m mertime traditions a appeal more to the p primal urges of h hunter-gatherer man t than the custom of cooking meat over a smoky open fi re, then pairing the result with a refreshing beer. According to one folk tale, the word “barbecue” derives from “Bar, Beer and Cues,” a sign found on roadhouses that ad-vertised liquid refreshment and pool tables. Etymologists, however, trace the term to the Caribbean barabicu and the European derivation barbacoa . Today, barbecue cov-See Smokin’! p. 4 ew Belgium Brewing Co. in Fort Collins, Colo., whose Fat Tire Amber Ale (the beer named after a bike) is perhaps the most oft-requested beer you can’t get here, will fi nally start shipping to the Mid-Atlantic later this summer. Beginning late August, residents of Maryland, Virginia and Washington, DC will be able to buy 22-oz bottles of Fat Tire , Ranger IPA and fall seasonal Hopto-ber . Strong craft beer markets, such as the Baltimore and DC areas, will also see New Belgium Tripel and the brewery’s Lips of Faith series of one-off experimental beers. See New Belgium p. 10 INSIDE Fairy Hopmother ................................... 3 The Ice Age of Brewing...................... 12 Homebrew News ................................. 14 Recipe Corner ..................................... 15 Maps & Directories ........................ 20-23 State by State News Virginia ............. 16 Pennsylvania .... 24 Philadelphia ..... 26 E. Penn. ............ 28 Maryland ........... 30 Baltimore .......... 32 New Jersey ....... 36 W. Virginia ........ 38 Delaware ........... 40 Washington DC .42

Smokin’!

Alexander D.Mitchell IV

Arbecue! Few summertime traditions appeal more to the primal urges of hunter-gatherer man than the custom of cooking meat over a smoky open fi re, then pairing the result with a refreshing beer.

According to one folk tale, the word “barbecue” derives from “Bar, Beer and Cues,” a sign found on roadhouses that advertised liquid refreshment and pool tables.

Etymologists, however, trace the term to the Caribbean barabicu and the European derivation barbacoa. Today, barbecue covers a wide spectrum of meat and cooking styles, from the traditional Carolina pulled pork to Central American rotisserie chicken to Korean bulgogi to Middle Eastern shish kabob.

In North American, barbecue is generally based on the concept of slow-cooking with indirect heat, typically allowing a smoke infusion to fl avor the meat. Crucial to the technique is the addition of extra fl avors through marinades, dry spice rubs, sauces or any combination thereof.

Barbecue in the American Southeast is traditionally pork-based, whereas in the Southwest beef tends to dominate. But it can include other meats like ham and sausage, even cedar-planked salmon and “shrimp on the barbie.”

Not Your Father’s Smokehouse

Pairing beer and barbecue used to mean downing an ice-cold can of PBR at some rib shack off the main highway. But lately, we’ve noticed the rise of a new urban, upscale type of smokehouse that offers a wide range of craft beer to match up with the widely varying styles of barbecue.

Kloby’s Smokehouse in Laurel, Md. Derives its name from proprietor Steve “Kloby” Klobosits, a former paramedic and fi refi ghter from the Philadelphia area.

The restaurant serves a wide range of traditional barbecued meats from beef brisket to turkey breast, but the house specialty is Carolina-style pulled pork piled high on a bun, served with a Western Carolina-style sauce that moderates the traditional vinegar and hot peppers with one-third ketchup. Kloby’s offers several other sauces, including a northern Alabama-style white sauce (mayonnaise and horseradish) called “Bama Pearl” that works well with the barbecued turkey.

Kloby’s switched to craft beers in September 2009, installing a 12-tap draft tower. The restaurant now has 20 additional taps at a second bar on the opposite side of the room and about 40 bottled craft selections. Klobosits likes to emphasize local product: He’s got several Heavy Seas taps, and his biggest seller is Evolution Porter from Evolution Brewing Co. In Delaware. He tries to keep one barrel-aged beer in the mix and taps a fi rkin every Thursday. But pay no attention to the beer list on his website; he never updates it.

Kloby’s serves up Boston butt shoulder cut (about 1,000 lb a week), rather than whole hog like traditional Eastern Carolina barbecue. But if it’s the entire pig you’re craving, two northern Virginia restaurants offer an outdoor pig roast once a month during the warm weather. 3 Bar and Grill in Arlington stocks seven drafts and 75 bottled selections to accompany a Southern-style menu that includes such innovative dishes as maple bacon ice cream for dessert. What goes well with the basic pulled pork sandwich? “I’d recommend an IPA, although I’ve been drinking Bell’s Oberon non-stop,” laughs head chef Brian Robinson. The next pig-outs are set for Aug. 18 and Sept. 15.

Chugging beer straight from the can is a summertime ritual, and Jackson 20 in Alexandria, Va. Carries 25 canned selections in addition to 20+ bottled beers and a couple drafts. At its “pig-a-palooza” in the courtyard of the Morrison House Hotel (they hold it on the second Wednesday of each month through November if the weather permits), the beer of choice is Hell or High Watermelon Wheat from 21st Amendment Brewery in San Francisco. “We sell a ton of it,” says chef Dennis Marron.

The Percy Street Barbecue in Philadelphia lists an amazing 63 better beers in cans on its website. Yards Brewing Co. Makes a special root beer for Percy Street, which the restaurant incorporates into its house chili.

We’d be amiss if we didn’t mention T-Bonz Grill in Ellicott City, Md., which recently expanded from 15 to 40 taps; and JD’s Smokehouse in the Canton neighborhood of Baltimore, which has increased its selection to 50 drafts. These locations operate just as much as beer bars as barbecue joints.

Mark Your Calendars

Then there are special events that pair beer and barbecue.

For the last seven or so years, Tuscarora Mill in Leesburg, Va. Has held an annual “beerbecue” dinner featuring the beers of Lagunitas Brewing Co. In Petaluma, Calif. The most recent event, held June 1, included Korean short ribs spiced with soy sauce and crushed peanuts and served with kimchi, a highly seasoned dish of fermented vegetables. The restaurant paired it with Lagunitas Undercover Investigation Shutdown Ale, a strong, hoppy amber ale that commemorates a smokeout of a different kind: a 2005 pot bust that shut down the brewery for a month.

Since 2009, Yards has celebrated Philly Beer Week with Smoke ‘Em If You Got ‘Em, a celebration of all things smoky featuring smoked beer from the U.S. and Germany, barbecue from local restaurants (as well as an amateur barbecue contest), even cigars.

The Trigger Agency, a Baltimore-based promotion company, has been holding a series of Beer, Bourbon, & BBQ Festivals throughout the East for several years, with shows in New York City, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee. The festivals typically offer a choice of 60-some beers and 40-some bourbons, with local and regional barbecue caterers selling their wares (and sometimes offering side-by-side samples of different barbecue styles).

Every March, Heavy Seas holds a beer and barbecue festival at the brewery. Those also with a craving for smoked meats might want to mark Sept. 17 on their calendar, the date for the Heavy Seas Beer & Bacon Fest at the brewery, featuring bacons from around the world. Heavy Seas will also be pouring at the Capital Bacon & Beer Bash at National Harbor, Md. On Nov. 19. That event (also promoted by The Trigger Agency) will include a hog-butchering demonstration, along with an assortment of fl avored bacons (jalapeño, apple cinnamon, juniper, etc.) for sampling. Last year’s show also featured a smorgasbord of bacon-infused items ranging from vodka to jam to chocolates and popcorn. Jones Soda Co. Even contributed a bacon-fl avored soda, which, alas, tasted like carbonated frying pan drippings.

Our advice: stick with the beer.

Greg Kitsock, George Rivers and George Hummel contributed to this article.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Smokin%E2%80%99%21/797854/77102/article.html.

New Belgium

The Brews Brothers

New Belgium Brewing Co. In Fort Collins, Colo., whose Fat Tire Amber Ale (the beer named after a bike) is perhaps the most oft-requested beer you can’t get here, will fi nally start shipping to the Mid-Atlantic later this summer.

Beginning late August, residents of Maryland, Virginia and Washington, DC will be able to buy 22-oz bottles of Fat Tire, Ranger IPA and fall seasonal Hoptober.
Strong craft beer markets, such as the Baltimore and DC areas, will also see New Belgium Tripel and the brewery’s Lips of Faith series of one-off experimental beers.

New Belgium intends to follow up with the fi rst draft sales as of Nov. 1 and to introduce 12-oz bottles to the area in early 2012.

Beer drinkers in Pennsylvania, New York and the rest of the Mid-Atlantic will have to bide their time, however: New Belgium plans no further expansion for 2011. “I think we will fi ll in other gaps in the country before we take on the enormous markets in the Northeast,” said Neil Reeve, New Belgium’s Mid-Atlantic regional director (although he added that the company might move into the “pocket of West Virginia” before then).

After interviewing 40 distributors from the Maryland-Virginia-DC area, New Belgium has settled on a patchwork network of nine Anheuser-Busch distributors, seven MillerCoors houses and one independent wholesaler, Richmond-based Specialty of Virginia, to handle the new markets.

“We do have the luxury of choosing whatever distributors we believe serve the market best,” said Reeve.

In 2010, New Belgium brewed more than 660,000 barrels of beer, an increase of about 14% over 2009. It’s the third-largest craft brewer in the United States after Boston Beer Co. And Sierra Nevada.

The brewery, now celebrating its 20th year, was founded in 1991 by the husbandand- wife team of electrical engineer Jeff Lebesch and social worker and mother-oftwo Kim Jordan. Lebesch developed his love of Belgian beers while pedaling through Belgium in 1988 on a fat-tired mountain bike.

The two began brewing in the basement of their home. Jordan, now company president, was originally New Belgium’s head marketer, bottler and salesperson, delivering beer in the family station wagon.

“It’s been a tremendous ride,” commented Jordan. “We started out just trying to produce 60 cases a week to survive and it has far exceeded our wildest dreams.”
Brewmaster Peter Bouckaert came to New Belgium 15 years ago, after serving as production manager at Belgium’s classic Rodenbach Brewery, renowned for its sour beers aged in 150-year-old oak casks.

He notes with a smile that he “stays true to the three Belgian Reinheitsgebot ingredients: experience, knowledge, and creativity.” He refuses to be captive to style guidelines. “I hate styles. Styles are limiting the creativity of the brewer. Styles are a box. You taste the beer for the merits of the beer and not for its style.”

New Belgium’s Lips of Faith series of small-batch, esoteric brews has allowed Brouckaert to experiment with sour beers, barrel-aging and wild fermentations.

Penciled in for third quarter 2011 are two new Lips of Faith releases, one of which has a local connection. Clutch is a strong, dark, sour ale brewed in collaboration with the Germantown, Md. Hard rock band of the same name, which also is celebrating its 20th anniversary. Clutch will be released with the initial rollout. The band fi rst toured the brewery a couple of years ago with New Belgium brewer and Clutch fan Eric Salazar. They fell in love with sour styles and were reportedly involved throughout the Clutch brewing process - from concept through execution, right down to label design. The beer’s label description reads, “Pure rock fury meets Belgian-style brewed folly in this collaboration with Maryland hard rockers, Clutch.
A pronounced bass line of dark chocolate, coffee and black malts bridge the sourness of our dark wood ale for a fl uid riff.”

For the fall, New Belgium will release Kick, a pumpkin cranberry beer aged in wood for a slight sourness. According to Reeve, the brewery might have some Super Cru left for the Mid-Atlantic market. This pumped -up version of Fat Tire, brewed with Asian pear juice and fermented with a Belgian saison yeast, was made to celebrate the company’s 20th year in business.

New Belgium considers sustainability and environmental stewardship to be core values. Since 1999 New Belgium has purchased 100% of its electricity from the City of Fort Collins Wind Program. Employees, after a year on the job, are given a custom cruiser bicycle to encourage bike commuting. Prius cars are available for errands. Other innovations include a 200 kW photovoltaic array on the roof of their packaging building and a water treatment plant that recovers methane gas and converts it to heat.

New Belgium, which will soon bump its head against it capacity limit of 900,000 bbl, also is looking at opening a second brewery east of the Rockies. No timetable has been announced for choosing a site or starting construction.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/New+Belgium/797858/77102/article.html.

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