Mid Atlantic Brewing News August/September 2010 : Page 1

By Greg Kitsock here is a price we pay for flavor. Because they contain more alcohol and unfermented sugars, craft beers pack more calories per ounce than mainstream brews. But do craft drinkers care? At the Biergarten Haus (above) in Washingon, DC, a few intrepid Weizen lovers engage in Masskrugstemmen. This fa-vored pastime in Bavaria involves holding steins at the end of outstretched arms until only one person remains able to do so. PHOTO BYMICHELLE DELEMARRE “We get very few calorie questions at the BA,” said Paul Gatza, director of the Colo-rado-based Brewers Association. “This one is the fi rst in years. I think that may be related to the way craft beer is enjoyed-in modera-tion, so that a few calories one way or the other isn’t a big deal for many who enjoy craft beer.” “I think the An Alpine duo entertain at The Biergarten Haus. PHOTO BYSTEPHEN LIPPS eg Kitsock here is a price we pay for flavor. Because they contain more alcohol and unfermented sugars, craft beers pack more calories per ounce than mainstream brews. But do craft drinkers care? At the Biergarten Haus (above) in Washingon, DC, a few intrepid Weizen lovers engage in Masskrugstemmen. This fa-vored pastime in Bavaria involves holding steins at the end of outstretched arms until only one person remains able to do so. PHOTO BYMICHELLE DELEMARRE “We get very few calorie questions at the BA,” said Paul Gatza, director of the Colo-rado-based Brewers Association. “This one is the fi rst in years. I think that may be related to the way craft beer is enjoyed-in modera-tion, so that a few calories one way or the other isn’t a big deal for many who enjoy craft beer.” “I think the An Alpine duo entertain at The Biergarten Haus. PHOTO BYSTEPHEN LIPPS under under God’s own sun and sky and clink steins, is staging a comeback in the United States. Washington, DC’s first biergarten since before Prohi-bition-appropriately dubbed -the Biergarten Haus -opened in June in the gentrifying Atlas District, just in time to broad-cast the World Cup on out-T he biergarten, that Teutonic institution where folks from all walks of life sit on communal benches The Westover Beer Garden in Arlington, Va. PHOTO BYSTEVE MARLER door projection screens to the throngs gathered in the expan-sive courtyard. In Jessup, Md., the shut-tered Blob’s Park reopened on New Year’s Day 2008 after a real estate deal stalled that would have shut down the park permanently. “The bulldozers and backhoes could show up any day now,” acknowledges Max Eggerl, son of the found-ers, who has leased back the property for three years. In the meantime, Blob’s, whose out-door pavilion can seat several See Garden pg. 4 concern is about zero,” echos Brett Joyce, president of Rogue Ales in Newport, Ore, whose beer labels list brewing specs, ingredients, even food pair-ing recommen-dations ... just tsock here is a price we pay for flavor. Because they contain more alcohol and unfermented sugars, craft beers pack more calories per ounce than mainstream b reg Kitsock here is a price we pay for flavor. Because they contain more alcohol and unfermented sugars, craft beers pack more calories per ounce than mainstream brews. But do craft drinkers care? At the Biergarten Haus (above) in Washingon, DC, a few intrepid Weizen lovers engage in Masskrugstemmen. This fa-vored pastime in Bavaria involves holding steins at the end of outstretched arms until only one person remains able to do so. PHOTO BYMICHELLE DELEMARRE “We get very few calorie questions at the BA,” said Paul Gatza, director of the Colo-rado-based Brewers Association. “This one is the fi rst in years. I think that may be related to the way craft beer is enjoyed-in modera-tion, so that a few calories one way or the other isn’t a big deal for many who enjoy craft beer.” “I think the An Alpine duo entertain at The Biergarten Haus. PHOTO BYSTEPHEN LIPPS under God’s own sun and sky and clink steins, is staging a comeback in the United States. Washington, DC’s first biergarten since before Prohi-bition-appropriately dubbed - the Biergarten Haus - opened in June in the gentrifying Atlas District, just in time to broad-cast the World Cup on out-T he biergarten, that Teutonic institution where folks from all walks of life sit on communal benches The Westover Beer Garden in Arlington, Va. PHOTO BYSTEVE MARLER door projection screens to the throngs gathered in the expan-sive courtyard. In Jessup, Md., the shut-tered Blob’s Park reopened on New Year’s Day 2008 after a real estate deal stalled that would have shut down the park permanently. “The bulldozers and backhoes could show up any day now,” acknowledges Max Eggerl, son of the found-ers, who has leased back the property for three years. In the meantime, Blob’s, whose out-door pavilion can seat several See Garden pg. 4 concern is about zero,” echos Brett Joyce, president of Rogue Ales in Newport, Ore, whose beer labels list brewing specs, ingredients, even food pair-ing recommen-dations ... just beer beer belly contest at Das Best Oktoberfest at the National Harbor in Maryland in Sept. 2009. about everything but calories. David Zinczenko and Matt Goulding, editors at Men’s Health magazine and authors of the recently published Drink This, Not That! (Rodale Inc., 2010), think otherwise. “Millions of people fall into the category of health-con-scious beer drinkers,” asserted Goulding via ILLUSTRATIONS BY: HANS GRANHEIM INSIDE Beer Hall Bill of Fare: AWurst Case Scenario.................................5 Munich on the Move: American Hofbrauhauses.............................9 Hop Ed: Mowing Down Thirst..................11 Book Review................................................16 Calendar.......................................................39 PHOTO COURTESY OF THE TRIGGER AGENCY email. “And without com-panies willingly providing them with calorie and carb counts, they don’t have full control of their diets because they simply don’t know what they’re putting in their bodies.” Drink This, Not That! is a calorie counters’ guide to both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages ranging from cab-ernets and liqueurs to fruit smoothies, sodas and energy drinks. Beer takes up a small part of its 320 pages, but the authors do provide information you won’t fi nd in most Beer 101 guides ... like average calories per style per 12-oz serving (for American lagers like Bud or See Gutbusters pg. 6 State by State News Virginia..................14 C.Pennsylvania....22 Philadelphia..........24 E. Pennsylvania...26 Maryland...............28 Baltimore..............30 New Jersey...........34 W. Virginia.............36 Delaware...............37 DC..........................38

Gutbusters

Greg Kitsock

There is a price we pay for fl avor.Because they contain more alcohol and unfermented sugars, craft beers pack more calories per ounce than mainstream brews.

But do craft drinkers care?

“We get very few calorie questions at the BA,” said Paul Gatza, director of the Colorado- based Brewers Association. “This one is the fi rst in years.

I think that may be related to the way craft beer is enjoyed-in moderation, so that a few calories one way or the other isn’t a big deal for many who enjoy craft beer.” “I think the concern is about zero,” echos Brett Joyce, president of Rogue Ales in Newport, Ore, whose beer labels list brewing specs, ingredients, even food pairing recommendations ... just about everything but calories.

David Zinczenko and Matt Goulding, editors at Men’s Health magazine and authors of the recently published Drink This, Not That!(Rodale Inc., 2010), think otherwise. “Millions of people fall into the category of health-conscious beer drinkers,” asserted Goulding via email. “And without companies willingly providing them with calorie and carb counts, they don’t have full control of their diets because they simply don’t know what they’re putting in their bodies.”

Drink This, Not That! Is a calorie counters’ guide to both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages ranging from cabernets and liqueurs to fruit smoothies, sodas and energy drinks. Beer takes up a small part of its 320 pages, but the authors do provide information you won’t fi nd in most Beer 101 guides ... like average calories per style per 12-oz serving (for American lagers like Bud or Miller, 135-155 calories; pale ales, 140-180; porters, 140-220; and IPAs, 180-240).

The Beast of the Beer Jungle

The book has drawn flak from craft aficionados for listing Sierra Nevada Barleywine Style Bigfoot Ale as #15 on the authors’ list of the 20 worst drinks in America. Noting that Bigfoot stuffs 330 calories into a 12-oz serving (almost 2,000 calories per sixpack), Zinczenko and Goulding refer to it as the “undisputed beast of the beer jungle.” (It’s not-see sidebar on “Extreme Beers, Calorie-Wise.”) “Let’s hope the appearance of this gut-inducing guzzler in your fridge is as rare as encounters with the fabled beast himself,” they write.

“It’s a stupid way of judging anything, like saying, ‘Don’t eat a pound of butter,’ “ counters Ken Grossman, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.’s founder and president.

Indeed, Bigfoot is so massively malty that drinking a sixpack at one sitting is almost impossible. Even one bottle is too much for many drinkers. “For a beer like this I prefer a 12-oz brandy snifter shared in 3- or 4-oz portions,” comments Rick Garvin, northern Virginia homebrewer and cofounder of Mad Fox Brewing Co. In Falls Church.

On the other hand, guzzling four bottles of Miller Lite-a much more poundable beer-would set you back 384 calories. But Zinczenko and Goulding don’t factor in the consumption habits of craft versus mainstream drinkers.

The authors of Drink This, Not That!Are not anti-beer, however. In fact, Goulding describes himself as “a bit of a beer nut.” Their book lists possible health benefi ts of moderate drinking (the hops in an amber ale might help lower cholesterol, for instance), They also challenge the notion of the “beer belly,” insisting that the paunch that heavy drinkers develop comes not so much from the brewskis but from the nachos, chicken wings and other snacks consumed alongside.“When you drink, your body goes into overtime trying to burn [alcohol] off quickly,” they write. As a result, everything else you consume gets put on the back burner. “So those calories are more likely to be stored as fat.”

Zinczenko and Goulding offer lowercalorie alternatives to the drinks they peg as exceptionally fattening. But their suggestions aren’t always helpful. Instead of Bigfoot, for instance, they recommend drinking Leinenkugel’s Fireside Nut Brown Ale (155 calories per 12 oz). But the two seasonal beers belong to very different styles and aren’t likely to share a shelf: Fireside comes out in November, while Bigfoot isn’t released until late January or February.

Your Right to Know

Admittedly, fishing around for the lowest-calorie example of a style isn’t easy.Goulding says that he often had to phone the brewery for this information, or consult a third party.

The federal Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) requires a listing of calories on a beer label only for those brands that call themselves “light” or “lite.” Otherwise, this information is optional.

But when a beer lists calories per standard serving, it must also list carbohydrates, protein and fat content.This applies to all advertising. The Dogfi sh Head Craft Brewery in Milton, Del. Once posted calorie counts for its brands on its website, but the TTB asked them to remove the information because the site lacked a more complete nutritional breakdown.

In 2007, the TTB floated a proposal (Notice No. 73) that would require all alcoholic beverage labels to include a “serving facts” panel listing calories, carbs, protein and fat.But the comment period ended in 2008, and the TTB has yet to issue final regulations. Art Resnick, TTB’s director for public and media affairs, was unable to say when the agency might act.

Before that happens, the Obama Healthcare Act might require restaurants chains with 20 or more branches to list the calorie count for items on their regular and drinks menus.The Food and Drug Administration has been given a year from the date of the act’s passage (March 23, 2010) to draw up guidelines. At least two brewpub chains, Rock Bottom and Gordon Biersch, would be affected.

Goulding answers “Absolutely!” when asked if calorie count should be mandatory for all beers. In the meantime, he gives the following advice: “If I’m enjoying an excellent high-alcohol beer, I’ll try to keep it to one. If I know I’m drinking more than one, then I seek out a low-calorie session beer. For me, that’s Guinness. Beer snobs may thumb their noses at the ubiquitous Irish brew, but I defy them to fi nd a better beer for fewer than 125 calories.”

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Gutbusters/470319/44378/article.html.

The Trimphant Return of the Biergarten

Mabn Staff

The biergarten, that Teutonic institution where folks from all walks of life sit on communal benches under God’s own sun and sky and clink steins, is staging a comeback in the United States.

Washington, DC’s first biergarten since before Prohibition- appropriately dubbed

- the Biergarten Haus - opened in June in the gentrifying Atlas District, just in time to broadcast the World Cup on outdoor projection screens to the throngs gathered in the expansive courtyard.

In Jessup, Md., the shuttered Blob’s Park reopened on New Year’s Day 2008 after a real estate deal stalled that would have shut down the park permanently. “The bulldozers and backhoes could show up any day now,” acknowledges Max Eggerl, son of the founders, who has leased back the property for three years. In the meantime, Blob’s, whose outdoor pavilion can seat several Hundred, dishes out German beer, cuisine and culture as it’s done since 1933.

In Mayo, near the end of the road on an Anne Arundel County peninsula below Annapolis, the Old Stein Inn carries on the traditions started in 1983 by founders Karl and Ursula Selinger from the Rhineland Pfalz region of Germany. The restaurant’s “Bierstube” bar offers eight regular German drafts, with one tap reserved for of Lindemans Framboise as a concession to those who don’t care for German beer. The exterior beer garden offers up open-air dining seasonally with musical entertainment on Saturdays, spring to fall.

In Philadelphia, restaurateur Stephen Starr is planning a 250-seat biergarten for the Fishtown neighborhood, with a projected fall opening. And in Philly’s Fox Chase neighborhood, Mike “Scoats” Scotese of the Grey Lodge Pub has taken over the former Old Brauhaus and Blue Ox and intends to reopen it as The Hop Angel Brauhaus, complete with biergarten.

“Right now it’s blacktop on the side of the building, so we have a lot to do,” he says. “I’d like to grow hops in our beer garden. While I’d love to do traditional long picnic tables, we still need to determine what the best type of seating for the space.”

One of the most ambitious projects is the Lager House planned for Riverfront Park in Cincinnati, a partnership between the Christian Moerlein Brewing Co. And the Cincinnati Park Board.

The 15,000 sq-ft restaurant, with seating for 500 indoors and 600 outside, is set for a March 2012 opening. Moerlein, a contract operation that makes beer at the Lion Brewery in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., intends to brew 5,000 barrels of its beers annually at the new facility.

Gemütlichkeit American-Style

Some of these operations attempt to be as authentically German as possible. DC’s Biergarten Haus, for instance, serves only German beer, but the diverse draft selection includes two pilsners, three hefeweizens, four doppelbocks, a dunkel and a schwarzbier. They even offer a Radler, a popular German mixed drink, made from Gaffel Kölsch and lemon-and-lime soda.

On the other hand, the Bier Garden in Portsmouth, Va. Offers over 300 beers from 16 countries, including such U.S. offerings as Bear Republic Hop Rod Rye, Brooklyn Local 1 and 2, and yes, even Pabst Blue Ribbon.

The Biergarten Haus features an Alpine duo, one-half hailing from the Austrian Alps and the other half from the Italian side, who entertain the crowds every Friday evening and on other special occasions. Blob’s Park specializes in polka music but Eggerl has added a monthly country-and-western honky-tonk night.

In Arlington, Va., the Westover Market’s mini-biergarten (see article on p. 5) hosts local musicians as well as an all-female Irish band called Malarky that plays on the last Thursday of each month.

Traditionally, German biergartens have relied on a canopy of branches for shade, but American versions are more likely to use umbrellas. The Hofbräuhaus in Las Vegas, to ward off the scorching desert heat, has a completely enclosed biergarten, complete with artifi cial chestnut trees whose leaves took three months to glue on by hand.

From Keller to Garten

The biergarten evolved in tandem with the first lagering cellars. Brewers, who tunneled into hillsides and river banks to erect aging vaults, planted trees directly above to shade the ground and help regulate temperature. “Once the chestnut trees had taken hold, it did not take much imagination to place a few chairs and tables under their shady canopy and sell the brewery’s beer to the public-fresh, straight from the barrels below,“ writes Horst Dornbusch in his book Helles in the Classic Beer Styles series. Many Munich biergartens retain the word “Keller” (“cellar”) in their names.

German immigrants brought the tradition to America. Many U.S. brewery complexes of the late 19th and early 20th century included saloons and biergartens. Prohibition and the anti- German feelings that accompanied America’s entry into World War I, however, shut most biergartens down permanently. “They probably no longer fi t in with the cultural character of a post-WWI nation that had so bitterly fought the Krauts of the Kaiser in the trenches,” speculates Dornbusch.

The craft brewing revolution in America helped revive the brewery biergarten. Stoudt’s in Adamstown inaugurated its outdoor courtyard in 1978 and Bube’s Brewery in Mount Joy, Pa. Has maintained a shaded biergarten since it opened as a restaurant in the early 1980s ... though in both cases, long before these establishments started brewing their own beer.

Dornbusch continues, “Especially since the Kennedy and Reagan speeches in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin and the subsequent fall of the Wall, Germany’s image as a reliable American ally and economic partner has been rehabilitated. In fact, Germany appears to be 'in' with the younger crowd these days.” The biergarten, he concludes, is a barometer of “the popularity and cultural acceptance, or lack thereof, of anything German.”

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/The+Trimphant+Return+of+the+Biergarten/470321/44378/article.html.

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