Mid Atlantic Brewing News December 2015/January 2016 : Page 1

Fun to Eat! Minors Retreat! By Kathy Ganser-Abat e W By Greg Kitsock e never lose our taste for sweets. The candies of our youth merely give way to adult desserts like liqueur-filled bonbons, cocktail-flavored lollipops ps and Kahlua-spiked cupcakes. And this holiday season, you can enjoy ice cream and cookies with specially formulated beer chasers. On Oct. 21, Washington, DC’s historic Howard Theatre—a venue that’s s hosted the likes of Duke Ellington, the Supremes and Stevie Wonder—saw New w Belgium Brewing Co. and Ben & Jerry’s s team up for what was described as a “foodie craft beer geek-out session.” New Belgium used the occasion to launch Salted Caramel Brownie Brown Ale , a sundae in a glass brewed with ILLUSTRATIONS BY HANS GRANHEIM chocolate ni nibs, vanilla beans and some salt added to the brewkettle for flavor enhancement. It’s lightly hopped (14 enhancem IBUs) with w Nugget and Goldings, measur measures 6.3 percent abv and, for the rec record, 197 calories per 12-oz glass … although who counts calories during the holidays? calori Ben & Jerry’s contributed B Salt Salted Caramel Brown-ie Ale Ice Cre Cream: a new flavor with salted caramel swirls, fudge brownie ca chunks and an infusion of c a malt-heavy, low-alcohol ( (1.5% abv) beer that New Belgium made especially for B the Vermont ice cream maker. t “We needed to make all the “ flavors very intense and f concentrated so the ‘beeriness’ co Patrons line up at the farmstead for pints and growlers of beer from Screamin’ Hill Brewery in Cream Ridge, New Jersey’s first farm brewery. PHOTO BY KATHY GANSER-ABATE comes through in the ice cream medium,” See Desserts p. 4 State by State News Virginia ...........10 W. Virginia ........9 C. Penn ............18 Philadelphia ...20 E. Penn ............22 Maryland ........24 Baltimore ........25 D.C. ..................27 New Jersey .....28 Delaware ........30 Hop Ed ........................................... 7 Homebrew News .........................12 Uberbrew Wins Alpha King ........12 Strength Matters ........................13 Fairy Hopmother ........................13 Maps ...................................... 14-17 Event Calendar ............................29 INSIDE ld McDonald had a farm in New Jersey and on his farm he had … some beer. Screamin’ Hill Brewery at Bullock Farms is the Garden State’s first st t farm brewery, located at t e d te in Cream Ridge, Monmouth County. The century-and-a-half old farm is run by fifth-generation farmer Martin Bullock, who tills the land with his 34-year-old son Brett. Brett graduated from the he e University of Vermont with a degree in n p plant la ant t and social science, and has been using his green thumb ever since, growing everything from soybeans to hops to evergreens. After sampling a few beers, wander into the gift shop where you’ll find everything from ornaments to wreaths to handmade items crafted from the farm’s dried gourds. You’ll also have your choice of pre-cut y Christmas trees from Pennsylvania. (Next Pennsylv va year, once their ten ten n acres of Christmas trees C grow g to ample size, you’ll be s able to cut down a your own again.) yo y Brett and his B partners, pa rtner rs brother-in-law and best la l w Patrick Jones J friend Cole, started out frie nd f d Ryan Rya n Cole Co le e , s st homebrewing. When they realized the possibilities of combining the farm’s bounty with their favorite pastime, it was a See Screamin’ p.2

Adult Desserts

Greg Kitsock

We never lose our taste for sweets. The candies of our youth merely give way to adult desserts like liqueur-filled bonbons, cocktail-flavored lollipops and Kahlua-spiked cupcakes.

And this holiday season, you can enjoy ice cream and cookies with specially formulated beer chasers.

On Oct. 21, Washington, DC’s historic Howard Theatre—a venue that’s hosted the likes of Duke Ellington, the Supremes and Stevie Wonder—saw New Belgium Brewing Co. And Ben & Jerry’s team up for what was described as a “foodie craft beer geek-out session.”

New Belgium used the occasion to launch Salted Caramel Brownie Brown Ale, a sundae in a glass brewed with chocolate nibs, vanilla beans and some salt added to the brewkettle for flavor enhancement. It's lightly hopped (14 IBUs) with Nugget and Goldings, measures 6.3 percent abv and, for the record, 197 calories per 12-oz glass ... although who counts calories during the holidays?

Ben & Jerry's contributed Salted Caramel Brown-ie Ale Ice Cream: a new flavor with salted caramel swirls, fudge brownie chunks and an infusion of a malt-heavy, low-alcohol (1.5% abv) beer that New Belgium made especially for the Vermont ice cream maker. "We needed to make all the flavors very intense and concentrated so the 'beeriness' comes through in the ice cream medium," explained New Belgium’s PR director Bryan Simpson. The formula. He added, is similar to the brownie ale in that both contain “copious chocolate and caramel malts, chocolate, vanilla and salt.”

The alcohol is so diluted, assures Ben & Jerry “flavor guru” Eric Fredette, that downing a whole pint might give you brain freeze but not a hangover.

The product launch preceded a concert by Galactic and Dr. Dog, with proceeds donated to the climate advocacy group Protect Our Winters. In addition, “Ben & Jerry’s and New Belgium will donate matching grants based on sales projections that we’re estimating will net around $100K for the campaign,” stated Simpson.

Both products will be available through the holiday season: the beer in sixpacks and kegs, the ice cream in pints or by the scoop at Ben & Jerry’s shops.

“We’ve made beer floats and they’re spectacular,” says Simpson.

Meanwhile, Flying Dog Brewery in Frederick, Md., for the second year in row, has teamed up with Otterbein’s Bakery for its Holiday Collection twelve-pack. The package contains four limited-edition beers formulated to pair with four cookies from the 134-year-old Baltimore-based bakery.

Normally, you wouldn’t serve hoppy beers alongside sweets, but director of brewery operations Ben Clark says his favorite combination is Cranberry IPA with lemon sugar cookies. “It’s probably the most spectacular pairing in the sense that it’s so unexpected. Together they taste like Fruit Loops or Fruity Pebbles.”

Orange white chocolate chips, described as the venerable bakery’s “first new cookie in decades,” are paired with a Belgian Style Pale Ale heavily dry-hopped with Saaz. “We kept the pale ale on the drier side, while the white chocolate is pretty sweet,” comments Clark. “The beer balances the cookies, the cookies balance the beer.”

Other suggested combos include a Citrus Saison flavored with dehydrated grapefruit, to be sipped with Otterbein’s sugar cookies; and a Fig and Fennel Stout that complements the bakery’s oatmeal raisin cookies with its notes of fruit and anise. The latter beer was “the last to get cut” from Flying Dog’s Brewhouse Rarities lineup for 2015, according to Clark.

Clark says that the lineup was chosen at a very unusual breakfast, a marathon 9 a.m. tasting session at the brewery tasting room back in late spring. “We got samples of all the cookies and went down the taps, taking notes on what we liked and what we didn’t like.”

The beers and the cookies will be available (in separate packages) through December at selected outlets in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, DC. Bottles of the four new beers have color-coded neck labels that correspond to the ties on the clear bags containing the cookies: yellow for lemon sugar; orange for the orange white chocolate chip; blue for the sugar; and purple for oatmeal raisin.

Who knows? Beer might yet replace milk as the beverage of choice to wash down cookies. But don’t offer any to Santa: he has to drive.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Adult+Desserts/2342214/283730/article.html.

Screamin' Hill

Kathy Ganser-Abate

Old McDonald had a farm in New Jersey and on his farm he had . Some beer.

Screamin' Hill Brewery at Bullock Farms is the Garden State's first farm brewery, local, e in Cream Ridge, Monmouth County. The century-and-a- half old farm is run by fifth-generation farmer Martin Bullock, who tills the land with his 34-yearold son Brett. Brett graduated from the University of Vermont with a degree in plant and social science, and has been using his green thumb ever since, growing everything from soybeans to hops to evergreens.

After sampling a few beers, wander into the gift shop where you’ll find everything from ornaments to wreaths to handmade items crafted from the farm’s dried gourds.

You’ll also have your choice of pre-cut Christmas trees from Pennsylvania. (Next year, once their ten acres of Christmas trees grow to ample size, you’ll be able to cut down your own again.)

Brett and his partners, brother-in-law Patrick Jones and best friend Ryan Cole, started out homebrewing. When they realized the possibilities of combining the farm’s bounty with their favorite pastime, it was a no-brainer. Luckily, Bullock’s father Martin was equally onboard with their vision. “The farm is extremely important to our family and he saw it as a way to ensure its future,” says Matt.

Their 7-bbl brewing system is housed in an area formerly occupied by the horse-drawn carriages used to transport grain. The farm still grows wheat, barley and rye, although they’ve yet to find a malting barley that will flourish in current conditions.

Besides grain, the farm’s mainstays are corn and soybeans, as well as a seasonal favorite, pumpkins, which the brewers wasted no time incorporating into their first pumpkin beer in September. They also added their own heirloom tomatoes and farm-grown basil to their wheat beer using a Randall, giving it a savory flavor. Their spicy habanero-infused beer boasts the same homegrown origin. Look for their spruce tip ale and stout coming out during the peak of the winter holiday season.

“We plan on growing blackberries, which we’ll also sell at our farmstand,” relates Bullock. “We’d also like to do lots of spices, like coriander … whatever we want to put in our beer.” And the farm can sell the surplus as retail.

This farm-to-brewery concept didn’t come without its problems. The local authorities told Screamin’ Hill that their septic system couldn’t handle the wastewater generated by the brewery. The owners had no choice but to install a 1,000-gallon holding tank to hold their wash water. However, the result is a fantastic green solution. The wash water is funneled back to the crops for irrigation.

Not to waste any environmentally beneficial opportunity, they also repurpose the spent grain used during the brewing process. Local cattle farmers purchase it for feed.

Screamin’ Hill’s beer can only be found on draft in their taproom and down the road at the Gambler Ridge Golf Club, whose owners are long-time friends of the Bullocks.

As of press time, this beer lover’s oasis in the middle of roadside produce stands and New Jersey farmland was serving Pumpkin Pickin’ Ale, Rye IPA and Chocolate Porter. According to Brett, they only brew one day per week and don’t anticipate that changing. “No one is quitting their day job,” he says. Even if it’s only feet away.

Visit the brewery’s tasting room Friday 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Screamin’ Hill Brewery
83 Emleys Hill Road
Cream Ridge NJ.
Phone 609-401-2025
www.screaminhill.com.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Screamin%27+Hill/2342226/283730/article.html.

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