Mid Atlantic Brewing News October/November 2015 : Page 1

PAPAL DISPENSATIONS ILLUSTRATION I ILL IL LL L L US UST U S RA RAT R AT A T I ION IO ON O N BY: BY B Y : :H HANS H AN ANS A NS N S GRANHEIM G R GR Story and Photos By Alexander D. Mitchell IV By George Hummel & Mark Haynie ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM ILLU s the Philadelphia elphia area ar geared up for fo the arrival of Pope Francis on Sept. S 26-27, all kinds of mementos were being g made available, ranging from mugs ugs to magnets to t-shirts to one bobblehead head of the Pontiff grasping a pretzel in one hand and a cheesesteak in the other. Several papal-inspired brews were set to be tapped, most drawing inspiration ration from the Trappist brewing tradition on and two incorporating ingredients s from Franc Francis’s homeland of Argentina. In the blue-collar n neighborhood of Kensington, P Philadelphia Brewing Co. became the first to announce a b pap papal commemorative beer. As “makers of heavenly beer,” says “mak PBC co-owner co Bill Barton with tongue in cheek cheek, “we brewed 60 bbl of a 10%-Belgian-style triple.” Holy Wooder abv Belg is the b brew’s name (riffing on how someone someo with a thick Philly accent would say “water”). Barton released See Papal p. 2 State by State News Virginia ...........10 Maryland ........24 W. Virginia ........9 Baltimore ........25 C. Penn ............18 D.C. ..................27 Philadelphia ...20 New Jersey .....28 E. Penn ............22 Delaware ........30 Fairy Hopmother .......................... 5 Book Review.................................. 8 Homebrew ...................................12 Strength Matters ........................13 Maps ...................................... 14-17 Event Calendar ............................29 nlike many drinking establishments, whose interiors seem to have been ordered prefabricated from a franchise catalog, Max’s Taphouse in Baltimore looks like some madcap metallurgist designed it. Like many bars, the walls are lined with beer advertising signs and lights, but they’ve been incorporated into collages, with many twisted into 3-D metal shapes the breweries never anticipated. One finds lamp shades with laser-carved lettering fashioned out of sixtel keg tops; giant Belgian beer bottles locked in cages; and a “Tailgate Bus” painted in Baltimore Ravens purple that seems to be exiting from the walls. Sitting outside on the street median is what looks for all the world like a four-man bobsled, except it’s got wheels. It’s fashioned INSIDE from hundreds of beer signs, an “art car” constantly being photographed by tourists and beer aficionados. Max’s owner Ron Furman explains, “My friend Fred Stuever treated me to a welding class for my birthday a few years back and I got bitten by the bug. But it's not about just working with metal. It's wood, light, water, baby doll parts—we just love to make stuff. “It would most likely be more cost-effective to buy some of what we make, but what fun is that? Then Max’s would look like any other place!” Furman’s motto is “reuse, reclaim and repurpose.” The floor and the walls on the second floor came from the old Seagrams distillery warehouse in Dundalk. The railing on the second floor originally graced a Coca-Cola plant in Locust Point; it was part of the trolley system for moving bottles around the plant. The flooring includes See Max’s p.7

Papal Dispensations

George Hummel & Mark Haynie

As the Philadelphia area geared up for the arrival of Pope Francis on Sept. 26-27, all kinds of mementos were being made available, ranging from mugs to magnets to t-shirts to one bobblehead of the Pontiff grasping a pretzel in one hand and a cheesesteak in the other.

Several papal-inspired brews were set to be tapped, most drawing inspiration from the Trappist brewing tradition and two incorporating ingredients from Francis’s homeland of Argentina.

In the blue-collar neighborhood of Kensington, Philadelphia Brewing Co. Became the first to announce a papal commemorative beer. As “makers of heavenly beer,” says PBC co-owner Bill Barton with tongue in cheek, “we brewed 60 bbl of a 10%- abv Belgian-style triple.” Holy Wooder is the brew’s name (riffing on how someone with a thick Philly accent would say “water”). Barton released the beer the first week of September, as a draft product only. He reports that the beer was a collaboration with Dennis Hewlett of the Pub on Passyunk East (a.k.a. the P.O.P.E.). “Dennis was very excited about the idea and so the official beer of the P.O.P.E. was created,” Barton elaborates.

The logo, featuring a smiling Pope Francis with a beer photo-shopped into his hand, had yet to generate controversy as of press time.

Philadelphia’s Iron Hill Brewery and Restaurant is in the more upscale Chestnut Hill neighborhood, where people have their own pronunciation of “water” (more likely, the imported, bottled kind). The popular brewpub’s Pap- Ale was described as a “patersbier”: a lowalcohol, session type of beer that Trappist monks have traditionally brewed for their own consumption.

Brewer Chris “Lappy” LaPierre described the mahogany-hued ale as having “the sweetness of dark Belgian candi sugar, paired with the distinct aroma of plum and pear.” He also added yerba mate, a kind of herbal tea native to South America and first domesticated by the Jesuits, the religious order to which Pope Francis belongs. It’s reported that the Pope drinks yerba mate regularly as a tonic for his nerves.

“It was meticulously researched, as we wanted to create a beer that Pope Francis may actually order,” says LaPierre, just in case the papal motorcade might make its way through Chestnut Hill.

Meanwhile, Manayunk Brewing Co. Took the concept of a papal beer to the next level, inviting Father John Kelly of St. John the Baptist Church in Manayunk to bless their brewing water. “This is the first time I’ve blessed beer,” Father Kelly said with a laugh. “I’m thrilled to be a part of it.” Owner Mike Rose added, “It’s great that this beer has such a strong Manayunk connection. St. John’s is one of the oldest churches in the city and it’s up the street.”

Also looking to His Holiness’s native land for inspiration, they brewed Papal Pleasure as a Belgian-style amber beer, with candi sugar from South America and infused with oak from Malbec wine barrels. “We immediately said to ourselves, ‘What is Argentina known for? Malbec grapes and pure cane sugar, so let’s make a beer that incorporates both flavors,’” explained head brewer Evan Fritz. The beer was to be available in limited amounts in 22-oz bottles and in kegs both at the brewpub and in other accounts throughout the city.

Philly’s two newest brewpubs added to the list of pope-inspired beers as well. Brewerytown’s literary-themed Crime and Punishment Brewing Co. Planned to offer Jesus Wept, a historic German-style gose beer.
In Old City, at the site of the former Triumph brewpub, 2nd Story Brewing Co. Brewer John Wible poured Pater Noster, a patersbier brewed with pilsner and red wheat malts.

New Jersey Rolls Out the Welcome Mat

Two South Jersey breweries also decided to release beers to celebrate Pope Francis’s visit.

Cape May Brewing Co. Wanted to brew a beer with Argentinian hops in honor of the Pope’s home country, but that proved to be nigh to impossible. So they decided to produce a beer with an “unholy amount of hops,” specifically three pounds per barrel. Nine varieties were used, including Simcoe and Citra.

They named it YOPO, “You Only Pope Once.” Brewery president Ryan Krill elaborated, “We’re always looking for ways to push the envelope. At the same time, it’s never a gimmick we’re after. YOPO will get a laugh from pop culture enthusiasts, sure, but it’s also a tasty and layered beer in its own right.” The taproom was to begin serving “heavenly pints” on Sept. 21; the brew was to appear in local pubs around the same time.

Flying Fish Brewing Co. In Somerdale brewed up a small-batch beer called Nope for those who decided not to brave the crowds to see the Pope. Gene Muller, brewery co-founder and president, thought it would be interesting to generate a little anti-hype. “Don’t want to walk to Philly? Come on over to Somerdale and enjoy the beers.” This session IPA of only 5% abv was to be served at the brewery taproom: a way to imbibe without serving penance in the morning.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Papal+Dispensations/2294562/276045/article.html.

The Madness Of Max's

Alexander D. Mitchell IV

Unlike many drinking establishments, whose interiors seem to have been ordered prefabricated from a franchise catalog, Max’s Taphouse in Baltimore looks like some madcap metallurgist designed it.

Like many bars, the walls are lined with beer advertising signs and lights, but they’ve been incorporated into collages, with many twisted into 3-D metal shapes the breweries never anticipated.

One finds lamp shades with laser-carved lettering fashioned out of sixtel keg tops; giant Belgian beer bottles locked in cages; and a “Tailgate Bus” painted in Baltimore Ravens purple that seems to be exiting from the walls. Sitting outside on the street median is what looks for all the world like a fourman bobsled, except it’s got wheels. It’s fashioned from hundreds of beer signs, an “art car” constantly being photographed by tourists and beer aficionados.

Max’s owner Ron Furman explains, “My friend Fred Stuever treated me to a welding class for my birthday a few years back and I got bitten by the bug. But it's not about just working with metal. It's wood, light, water, baby doll parts—we just love to make stuff.

“It would most likely be more costeffective to buy some of what we make, but what fun is that? Then Max’s would look like any other place!”

Furman’s motto is “reuse, reclaim and repurpose.” The floor and the walls on the second floor came from the old Seagrams distillery warehouse in Dundalk. The railing on the second floor originally graced a Coca-Cola plant in Locust Point; it was part of the trolley system for moving bottles around the plant. The flooring includes bowling lanes from the Southway bowling alley in Federal Hill. Almost all the tables were built from reclaimed wood, some from Clipper Mill in Woodberry. The lights that line the roof were, in a former life, plastic recyclable beer kegs.

Furman will be the first to tell you that he’s had plenty of help with his vision, including current and former employees. “All the adapted metal signage you see around the place, most of that was Mike Metcalf's creativity. Mike can take anything and turn it into an original piece.”

Max’s temporary window and rooftop displays are also a group effort. “Last year I came up with the idea that there are always eyes watching you, so with some help of friends Charles MacSherry, John Cutonilli and Gary Kiehl we made eyeballs out of plastic beer kegs with 10-watt LED bulbs and servos all controlled by an Arduino [electronic processor] board that John programmed to go back and forth like the eyes were following you. In addition, we had big eyes on the roof and the pupils went back and forth.”

The eye-catching car out front is one of several creations by Furman and his cohorts for the American Visionary Arts Museum's annual Baltimore Kinetic Sculpture Race, an all-terrain obstacle course for mobile sculpture projects. Originally entered as “Speed Racer” in 2011 and powered by pedal power, it was rebuilt into an electric-powered “pit wagon,” dubbed Max's Magic Bus, for the 2013 contest. Furman also has entered a clipper-ship-shaped entry in 2012 (dubbed the “Pride of Max’s”) and a “Rat Patrol” wagon in 2014.

But the “toughest, most expensive and time consuming” of Furman’s mobile projects was the Max’s Maryland Flyer that he built for the October 2006 Red Bull Flugtag, a contest for (purportedly) flying sculptures. That one broke Furman’s heart. First, a storm ripped one of the wings off. Then, while it was being duct-taped back together, it flew into the Inner Harbor. “I was devastated,” laments Furman.

Furman has made a few stand-alone art projects as gifts and is thinking about staging an exhibit of his art. But his bar remains his main gallery. “We're always looking to create more projects like this; it’s what makes Max's special. The cool factor is important!”

Postscript: As this article was being edited, the main bar at Max's suddenly closed for a couple days for renovation work, with customers being served at the side bar. Asked what had happened, the bartender replied, "Ron happened!"—a jocular jab at Furman's impulsive nature.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/The+Madness+Of+Max%27s/2294564/276045/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here