Mid Atlantic Brewing News August/September 2015 : Page 1

Aug/Sept • 2015 Volume 17/ Number 4 By Charles Pekow The view from Caboose Brewing Co.’s patio with the Washington & Old Dominion Trail PHOTO BY THOMAS CIZAUSKAS in the background. othing makes you appreciate a cold beer more than the exertion of a summer bike ride. Consider a trip along the 44.5-mile Washington & Old Dominion (W&OD) trail in Northern Virginia: It’s loaded with so many watering holes that it’s practically yy a brewery-by-bike y tour. The former rail il line converted into a paved linear park runs from rom Shirlington (a neighborhood of Arlington) west to Purcellville. Start art on the east side at the Village e at Shirlington at the trailhead. Bungalow Sports Grill doesn't open n until 4 p.m. but its draft selection includes, appropriately, Fat t Tire. Also in the complex, mplex, you'll find Capitol l City Brewing Co., which ich opens at 11. Bike groups regularly come in—as many as 40 0 or more on a group ride, says manager Brittany Winslow. Before we hit the trail again, a few words from Nicole Brown, president of the Virginia Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics. “I am a dietitian and I love to drink beer,” says Brown, whose brother owns San Pedro Brewing Co., a California microbrewery. She warns, “Sometimes people think of beer as a source of carbohydrate, but the carbs will not be available for several hours. The liver is working on the alcohol. Beer is not going to help with hydration.” py water and ideally, Drink some wa beer at the end of “enjoy the bee the ride,” she recommends. enjoy it midway, If you must en ingest some car carbohydrates, protein and fat. Rather than order mult multiple beers, split a sampler wi with friends. By Greg Kitsock I t was almost like sipping soy sauce. That was my first impression of Jerkface Porter, a one-off beer from DC Brau served cask-conditioned at The Big Hunt in Washington, DC. The beer was the latest collaboration n between the brewery and Eric Judycki, beer director at The Big Hunt and owner of Jerkface Artisanal Beef Jerky. Brewer Jeff Hancock chopped up 4-8 oz of Judycki’s garlic-green chili li jerky, stuffed it in a muslin sack and in of let it macerate in a five-gallon pin ut two his Penn Quarter Porter for about weeks. o adjust ” “It takes time for the palate to adjust,” cautions Hancock. Indeed, after a few swallows, it was like drinking a rauchbier with a spicy kick to the finish. Judycki has plenty of jerky for future Detour Deto Many cyclists take Ma a half-half-mile detour when they get to Falls Church to visit Mad Fox Brewing Bre Co. Best way to re reach the brewpub See Biking p.2 experiments: it comes in a wide spectrum of flavors from pastrami to pineapple habanero to ginger lime. Generally, darker beers pair better with the umami flavors of meat, but Judycki says his next nex project might be a saison. He’s talking with 3 Stars Brewing Co., another DC brewery, brewery about smoking some malt over rather than adding the meat his jerky je directly to the beer. dir He might want to confer with Saucony Creek Brewing Co. in Kutztown, Pa., which two years ago released an amber lager made with malt smoked over ring bologna. INSIDE Fairy Hopmother .......................... 5 Book Review.................................. 8 Homebrew ...................................12 Strength Matters ........................13 Maps ...................................... 14-17 Event Calendar ............................29 State by State News Virginia ...........10 Maryland ........24 W. Virginia ........9 Baltimore ........25 C. Penn ............18 D.C. ..................27 Philadelphia ...20 New Jersey .....28 E. Penn ............22 Delaware ........30 What’s Your Beef? W Vege Vegetarians didn’t used to have to worry when ordering a cold one: outside of honey and isinglass (a fining agent for cask ales made from fish bladders), there were See Bestiary p. 4 ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM

Summer Excursions

Charles Pekow

Nothing makes you appreciate a cold beer more than the exertion of a summer bike ride. Consider a trip along the 44.5-mile Washington & Old Dominion (W&OD) trail in Northern Virginia: It’s loaded with so many watering holes that it’s practically a brewery-by-bike tour.

Nothing makes you appreciate a cold beer more than the exertion of a summer bike ride. Consider a trip along the 44.5-mile Washington & Old Dominion (W&OD) trail in Northern Virginia: It’s loaded with so many watering holes that it’s practically a brewery-by-bike tour.

The former rail line converted into apaved linear park runs from shirlington (a neighborhood of arlington)west to Purcellville. Start on the east side at the Village at shirlington at the trailhead. Bungalow sports Grill doesn't openuntil 4 p.m but its draft selection includes appropriately, Fat tire.

Also in the complex, you'll find Capitol City Brewing Co., which opens at 11. Bike groups regularly come in—as many as 40 or more on a group ride,says manager Brittany Winslow.

Before we hit the trail again, a few words from Nicole Brown, president of the Virginia Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics. “I am a dietitian and I love to drink beer,” says Brown, whose brother owns San Pedro Brewing Co., a California microbrewery. She warns, “Sometimes people think of beer as a source of carbohydrate, but the carbs will not be available for several hours. The liver is working on the alcohol. Beer is not going to help with hydration.”

Drink some water and ideally, "enjoy the beer at the end of the ride",she recommends.If you must enjoy it midway,ingest some carbohydrates,protein and fat. Rather than order multiple beers, split a sampler with friends.

Detour

Many cyclists take a half-mile detour when they get to Falls Church to visit Mad Fox Brewing Co. Best way to reach the brewpub is to head southeast down Broad Street (Rt. 7) from the bridge where the route meets the bike trail, says general manager Joe Chapman.

Cyclists are especially fond of Mad Fox's Orange Whip IPA with its crisp citrus flavor, Chapman says (although the tasty Mason’s Mild, at just 3.3% abv, might be a more sensible choice—and Mad Fox recently tweaked the recipe to give it a maltier flavor). “They're usually wise enough to lap up a couple of glasses of water as well.” Mad Fox opens Sunday at 10 and 11 other days (with weekend brunch). It provides racks for 21 bicycles and more parking is available in the complex.

Ride west through downtown Vienna. West of mile marker 12, you'll find Caboose Brewing Co., which opens at 4 weekdays and noon weekends. At the west end of a warehouse district, it’s not where you’d expect to find a restaurant. It’s easy to cycle past it. You also have to drag your bike across some mud. Caboose is awaiting permits for better signage and a walkway.

On weekend afternoons, 70-80% of customers come off the trail, manager Patrick Giannelli estimates. “I like to call it spandex Saturday.” Bicyclists go for the hefeweizen and saison, Giannelli says. They also like the kale salad but “they often hit the burgers because they have to fill up.”

Westward Ho!

Further west, between mileposts 22 and 23 at Sterling Boulevard in Sterling, you'll come to Beltway Brewing Co., a contract brewer. The tasting room is open from 4 to 9 on Friday and 1 to 9 on Saturday. “We have different selections depending on who we're brewing for,” says a plant coordinator who only identified herself as Michelle. Beltway offers munchies but welcomes outside food. “You can always order a pizza while you're here,” Michelle says.

You won't find a place friendlier to cyclists than Old Ox Brewery at mile marker 25 in rural Ashburn. They offer not only bike parking but a pump and bike tools as well as indoor and outdoor seating. “We have a couple of beers designed with the cyclist in mind,” says president Chris Burns, such as the Alpha Ox IPA at 4.5% alcohol and the crisp Golden Ox “with a little bit of Belgian yeast, overall a very approachable beer for the cycling enthusiast.”

You can buy food from the rotating food trucks. “We have Gatorade and Cliff bars to make sure everyone is getting back on the trail energized and ready to go,” Burns says. Old Ox is open Wednesday through Friday 4-9, Saturday 11-9, Sunday 11-6. It gives tours at 2 and 3 on Saturday.

The End of the Rainbow

When you reach mile 34 in historic Leesburg, turn north at Harrison Street to Market Station. MacDowell Brew Kitchen (open daily at 11) tries to emulate Florida with white beach sand and palm trees from Florida but without the ocean. MacDowell offers 45 drafts and 115 bottled beers. Cyclists especially like the grilled chicken flatbread. “We cut it into a few pieces so you can share it with friends,” says general manager Sam Athens.

Way out at the other end of the line in Purcellville, precisely at the trailhead, lies Magnolias at the Mill, which offers indoor and outdoor dining daily at 11. “We're at the end of the rainbow,” notes manager Laurel Sherman. “At least 25% of our business is cyclists.” They partake of Magnolia’s 32 draft beers, then “normally get something to recharge so they can take the ride home,” such as a brick-oven pizza or hickory grilled burger.

And if you want a drink besides beer, glide half a block south to Catoctin Creek Distilling co. (CCDC) at 120 W. Main St. Owner Scott Harris was surprised that as soon as he opened, he was flooded with cyclists wearing clip-on shoes. So he installed a bike rack out front. CCDC even sells a lot of branded bike shirts. Bicyclists pay $85 to become walking ads for the distillery.

CCDC offers tastes of whiskey, gin and brandy plus snacks. “We make lots and lots of beer,” says Harris. “But we take the next step and make it into whiskey. When we talk to our brewery friends, we tease them and tell them that they only do half the job.” CCDC is open Tuesday-Friday 1-5, Saturday noon-7 and Sunday 1-6. It gives free tours at five minutes past the hour.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Summer+Excursions/2240211/268527/article.html.

A Brewer's Bestiary

Greg Kitsock

It was almost like sipping soy sauce. That was my first impression of Jerkface Porter, a one-off beer from DC Brau served cask-conditioned at The Big Hunt in Washington, DC. The beer was the latest collaboration between the brewery and Eric Judycki, beer director at The Big Hunt and owner of Jerkface Artisanal Beef Jerky. Brewer Jeff Hancock chopped up 4-8 oz of Judycki’s garlic-green chili jerky, stuffed it in a muslin sack let it macerate in a five-gallon pin his Penn Quarter Porter for about weeks.

“It takes time for the palate to adjust,” cautions Hancock. Indeed, after a few swallows, it was like drinking a rauchbier with a spicy kick to the finish.

Judycki has plenty of jerky for future experiments: it comes in a wide spectrum of flavors from pastrami to pineapple habanero to ginger lime. Generally, darker beers pair better with the umami flavors of meat, but Judycki says his next project might be a saison. He’s talking with 3 Stars Brewing Co., another DC brewery, about smoking some malt over his jerky rather than adding the meat directly to the beer.

He might want to confer with Saucony Creek Brewing Co. In Kutztown, Pa., which two years ago released an amber lager made with malt smoked over ring bologna.

What’s Your Beef?

Vegetarians didn’t used to have to worry when ordering a cold one: outside of honey and isinglass (a fining agent for cask ales made from fish bladders), there were no animal products in craft beer. That’s not necessarily the case now.

In 2010, Boston beer Co. Chairman Jim Koch teamed up with celebrity chef David Burke (known for appearances on Iron Chef America and Top Chef Masters) to brew a unique libation for Burke’s restaurants. The brew crew whipped up a recipe for a brown ale incorporating rosemary, molasses and 40 lb of beef hearts, grilled and sliced. “The beef hearts were added at the end of the boil, which imparted a savory and salty finish,” Koch says of this very limited-edition brew, dubbed Burke in the Bottle Beef Heart Ale.

The beer prompted one angry vegan to post a petition on change.org asking Boston Beer to “have a heart, and take the cow hearts out of their beer.” (It got 804 supporters.)

Five years later, Koch is still defending the beer. “I didn’t kill the cows! They were already dead when we grilled the hearts.” Asked about his own eating preferences, he comments, “I prefer vegetarian, but I will eat most anything. I’ve never met a beer I wouldn’t try and this recipe was pretty exciting to brew, so I was eager to try it.”

Sam’s Catch of the Day

Sam Calagione, president of Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, will try almost any ingredient—animal, vegetable or mineral. In 2013 he released Saxony-Anhalt Ale, a spiced amber ale with hartshorn—powdered deer antler—added to the boil. Last winter, the Dogfish brewpub in Rehoboth Beach made headlines with a breakfast stout incorporating 25 pounds of “super-lean” scrapple along with applewood-smoked barley, coffee and milk sugar. (An encore was planned for this summer.)

More successful—so much so that Dogfish was brewing a 100-bbl batch at its production brewery in Milton—is Choc Lobster. A robust porter with cocoa powder, basil and live lobsters added to the boil, Choc Lobster was first brewed, in a tiny batch, for a beer dinner back in 2012.The next two years, Dogfish repeated the recipe, serving it at the Great American Beer Festival. At the 2014 GABF, Choc Lobster received a silver medal in the Indigenous/Regional Beer category.

According to brewmaster Tim Hawn, the current version contains 25 lb of Maine lobster plus “hundreds of pounds” of heads and shells. “Since our boil is so efficient, all the ingredients are added to the whirlpools to prevent the loss of those volatile components, while providing enough time to cook and sterilize the ingredients.” The live lobsters were “dispatched” prior to immersion in the wort, he adds. After the brew they were fished out and put on ice in preparation for a weekend feast. “I mean, who wants to wreck the lobster and make the lobstermen cry in Maine?” laughs Hawn.

What do the lobsters contribute to the beer? “There is a subtle sweetness, some would say buttery, not in the diacetyl sort of way, from the lobster and a certain briny characteristic that comes out with this unique combination of ingredients,” answers Hawn.

In early August, the brewery plans to release kegs of its Choc Lobster through World of Beer locations in states where Dogfish beers are sold. Allocation is tight—each site will only get a keg or two, says Dogfish Head’s Justin Williams. The Dogfish Head Alehouses in the DC suburbs will also get an allotment.

“We're going to recommend the WOBs use lobster bibs,” adds Williams. “They’re a fun bunch and I’m sure they’ll get a kick out of the idea, but I can’t guarantee it.”

Corrections

A photo caption in our June/July issue misspelled the name of Richard O’Keefe, president of the Peabody Heights Brewing Co. In Baltimore, Md. We apologize for the error.

Also, in our April/May issue, in the article “A Fine Nip: Distilling Beer Into Schnapps,” we stated that Cooper Rivers Distillers was “possibly the first distillery ever to operate legally in the Garden State.” Reader Daniel Betz pointed out that Laird & Company in Scobeyville, NJ was awarded the country’s first commercial distilling license back in 1780 and makes applejack to this day. He also cited Jersey Artisan Distilling in Fairfield, which received its license in 2013 ahead of Cooper Rivers.

We thank Mr. Betz for the information and give credit where credit is due.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/A+Brewer%27s+Bestiary/2240226/268527/article.html.

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