Mid Atlantic Brewing News June/July 2014 : Page 1

June/July • 2014 Volume 16 / Number 3 Brewer's Art co-owner Volker Stewart (left) sits with Mark "Beazly" Barcus, the bartender for whom the house pale ale was renamed after the name "Ozzy" was retired. A one-of-a-kind "Ozzy" tap handle, also to be retired, is behind them. . PHOTO BY ALEXANDER D. MITCHELL IV Pennsylvania's Winery/Breweries By Jim Weber hink of “winery” and your mind pictures rolling meadows and vine-covered arbors. Think of “brewery” and the predominant view has been a clattering factory in the middle of a city. Exploding these stereotypes, however, are winemakers who have installed small breweries, producing artisanal beverages from both grapes and grain. Pennsylvania has three such dual operations and two more are on the way. The Vineyard at Hershey, which occupies 40 scenic acres in Middletown, opened in 2012 and added a By Alexander D. Mitchell IV P lausible deniability could be maintained when the tap handle on the upstairs bar was a pitchfork. But then The Brewer’s Art in Baltimore shifted production of its Belgian-style strong golden ale Ozzy to cans. The artwork featured a clenched fist with a tattoo spelling O-Z-Z-Y across the fingers, identical to the letters that Black Sabbath rocker Ozzy Osbourne sports on his left hand. The cans also included images of bats, some dripping blood—a reference to the notorious January 1982 incident in Des Moines, Iowa when Osbourne bit the head off a live bat thrown on stage by a fan. Additionally, a new tap handle was fashioned for the downstairs bar featuring the Osbourne fist. The imagery was simply too close for the comfort of Osbourne and his representatives, who sent a cease-and-desist letter to the brewpub in March. The Brewer’s Art negotiated an agreement late April; the name would be in l discontinued after the remaining dis s inventory of labels was used up in n T brewery during the summer of 2013. Ryan DeLutis, a graphic artist and brewmaster behind the custom-built 500-gallon (about 16-bbl) system, has been putting out a variety of ales, including flagships Pond Jumper (an American special bitter), Weize Guy (a hefeweizen), Hip Hops Hooray (an American IPA) and MILF Chocolate Brown Ale (made with milk chocolate and cacao nibs). Specialty releases have included such hybrids as Merloco (an oatmeal stout aged on Merlot-and brandy-soaked cacao nibs and oak chips) and Chardonnaison (a saison aged on Chardonnay-soaked oak chips). See Grapes conitinued p.5. INSIDE Event Calendar .............................. 2 Beach Blanker Brewery Tour ........ 6 Book Review.................................. 8 Philly Beer Week ........................... 9 Fairy Hopmother ........................10 Homebrew ...................................12 Hop Ed .........................................17 Maps ...................................... 18-21 See Name conitinued p.4.

Pennsylvania's Winery/Breweries

Jim Weber

Think of “winery” and your mind pictures rolling meadows and vinecovered arbors.
Think of “brewery” and the predominant view has been a clattering factory in the middle of a city.

Exploding these stereotypes, however, are winemakers who have installed small breweries, producing artisanal beverages from both grapes and grain.Pennsylvania has three such dual operations and two more are on the way.

The Vineyard at Hershey, which occupies 40 scenic acres in Middletown, opened in 2012 and added a Brewery during the summer of 2013. Ryan DeLutis, a graphic artist and brewmaster behind the custom-built 500-gallon (about 16-bbl) system, has been putting out a variety of ales, including flagships Pond Jumper (an American special bitter), Weize Guy (a hefeweizen), Hip Hops Hooray (an American IPA) and MILF Chocolate Brown Ale (made with milk chocolate and cacao nibs). Specialty releases have included such hybrids as Merloco (an oatmeal stout aged on Merlot- and brandy-soaked cacao nibs and oak chips) and Chardonnaison (a saison aged on Chardonnay-soaked oak chips).

President and partner Jason Reimer plans to raise hops and watermelon for the brewery’s summer seasonal in 2014. Visitors can relax on a spacious covered deck overlooking the vineyard and rolling Dauphin County farmland; there is an upstairs event room with an additional deck. The Vineyard & Brewery at Hershey is very convenient to Route 283 (Toll House Rd. exit) at 598 Schoolhouse Rd. The tasting room is currently open weekends from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Check out http:// vineyardathershey.com/the-brewery/ or phone 717-944-1569.

Windswept Vines

Gary Toczko opened Nimble Hill Winery in Mehoopany (not far from Scranton) in 2007, making about 3,000 gallons of wine a year. Their address at 219 Windswept Lane gives an idea of the expansive views available from the farm. Nimble Hill raises grapes but has to source additional fruit from Tunkhannock, Dushore and West Chester, as well as the North Fork of Long Island. (None of Pennsylvania’s winery/breweries are selfsufficient in producing grapes; this winter was particularly tough on vinifera vines, with yields in northernmost areas expected to drop to 25% of normal amounts.)

Nimble Hill vinifera and French- American hybrid wines have been entered into competitions with some success. Brewer Mike Simmons hopes to do the same with the beers from his 15-bbl brewhouse. Ranging from English-style mild to sour ale to Belgian-style strong ale, Nimble Hill beers are gradually penetrating the northeast corner of Pennsylvania via newly introduced 12-ouncers and specialty 750-ml bottles. Beers and wines can be purchased at the takeout store at 3971 SR 6 in Tunkhannock, Pa. Simmons said that the tasting room there is creating a lot of crossover, but “it’s more beer drinkers converted to wine drinkers” than the other way around.

Asked to compare brewing and winemaking, Simmons comments, “It’s not all that similar, except for the yeast.” Indeed, in his book Grape vs. Grain, master brewer Charles Bamforth asserts that making beer is “substantially more complicated.” For instance, while wine grapes are rich in fermentable sugar, the starches in barley are indigestible to yeast and need to be broken down in a process called malting. Another difference is the pH: wine is considerably more acidic than beer and provides a less friendly environment for bacteria. Sanitation is therefore a much bigger concern for the brewer.

Beer uses a much larger amount of water in the finished product than wine does. This Might be a worry if the brewery is surrounded by fracking operations, as Nimble Hill is, but Simmons insists that the local water has been inspected and certified safe.

From Cabernet Sauvignon to Root Beer

Grovedale Vineyard and Winery is situated on a beautiful and historical piece of land in Wyalusing, also in northeast Pennsylvania, that’s belonged to the Welles family since1812. Descendants and current owners Kim and Jeff Homer planted a vineyard in 2005, adding a tasting room in September 2008.Winemaker Jeff oversees eight acres of vineyards with 11 different varieties of red and white wine grapes.

Brewer Thor Trowbridge came on board during 2013, establishing the co-located River Barge Brewing Co. His efforts range from Even Kiel Brown to Killer Frog IPA to All Hail the Foam (a Scottish ale), as well as a homemade root beer. He added that there are plans to plant some Cascade hops. The water, although municipal, comes from a well on the property. The brewpub opens at 11:00 a.m. every day with most of the summer action out on their inviting deck. Check out www.Riverbargebrewing.com or phone 570-746-1400.

Swashbuckler Brewing Co. Outside Manheim in Lancaster County shares a site with the Mount Hope Winery and Estate, which offers a wide variety of vintages at its wine shop, including cherry, peach, pear and berry wines. However, no winemaking has been taking place on the property since Scott and Heather Bowser started brewing at Swashbuckler in the early 2000s. Mazza Vineyards near Erie, the parent company of Mt. Hope, actually makes the wines.

… to Hard Cider

Arundel Cellars and Brewing Co., also near Erie, will soon join the ranks of winery/ breweries. Owner Lori Boettcher opened in 2012; she also makes cider from apples from her orchard. Son Evan will be brewer; now that PLCB licensing has been obtained, the family will purchase a nano system. Plans include growing hops.

The business is more farm-like than the other operations in that it also sells fresh fruit and homemade cider. There’s no website.Phone 814-449-0378 for info or visit at 11727 East Main Rd. in North East.

York County’s Wyndridge Farm Cidery will take a similar approach. Home to a cidermaking operation since 2013, Wyndridge has plans to add a 30-bbl brewery. Beermaking responsibilities will fall to Scott Topel, the Current cider maker. A native of upstate New York, Scott began making cider in his midteens.He later migrated to the West Coast, gaining professional experience with a number of cideries, all the while continuing his other profession of teaching guitar.

The key to making great cider “is to obtain consistent pressings,” he notes. “The age and availability of apple varieties are important factors to consider.” Wyndridge Crafty Cider is made from locally sourced apples and is fermented on the dry side, which Scott indicated is better for blending with other ingredients.

The cidery is on a 60-acre farm, the ancestral home of former orthopedic surgeon Steve Groff. He and wife Julie will house the future brewery in one of several new conjoined entertainment spaces anchored by the old family barn. Things should come together around the end of the year. Updates will be available at www.wyndridge.com/cider/home. html and on Facebook. The website lists bottle shops and taprooms where you can enjoy Wyndridge’s regular cider, plus a tasty new hopped variety, in south central Pennsylvania and northern Maryland.

Wyndridge is at 885 South Pleasant St. in Dallastown, Pa. Phone 717-244-9900.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Pennsylvania%27s+WineryBreweries/1732329/212945/article.html.

Name Shortage Sparks Litigation

Alexander D. Mitchell IV

Plausible deniability could be maintained when the tap handle on the upstairs bar was a pitchfork.

But then The Brewer’s Art in Baltimore shifted production of its Belgianstyle strong golden ale Ozzy to cans.The artwork featured a clenched fist with a tattoo spelling O-Z-Z-Y across the fingers, identical to the letters that Black Sabbath rocker Ozzy Osbourne sports on his left hand. The cans also included images of bats, some dripping blood—a reference to the notorious January 1982 incident in Des Moines, Iowa when Osbourne bit the head off a live bat thrown on stage by a fan. Additionally, a new tap handle was fashioned for the downstairs bar featuring the Osbourne fist.

The imagery was simply too close for the comfort of Osbourne and his representatives, who sent a cease-and-desist letter to the brewpub in March. The Brewer’s Art negotiated an agreement in late April; the name would be discontinued after the remaining inventory of labels was used up (approximately three months, said brewpub co-owner Volker Stewart, giving Osbourne collectors a last chance to grab potential collectibles). Henceforth, the beer will be known as Beazly, the nickname of Brewer’s Art bartender Mark Barcus, who has tended bar there for nearly all of the brewpub’s 17-1/2-year history.

"The running joke was if you worked here long enough, you don't get a gold watch — you get a gold ale," brewpub co-owner Tom Creegan said.

The explosion of craft breweries (2,768 operating in 2013, with 1,744 more in planning, according to the Brewers Association), plus the sheer numbers of their offerings, has created a major headache for brewers. They not only have to search for distinctive names they can trademark, but also have to defend their brands against infringement.

The issues are basically insignificant if a beer’s name and marketing goes no further than a single brewpub’s menu, tap handle or chalkboard. But as a brewery’s popularity expands, what might have started as a simple tribute or inside joke can snowball into a major legal problem.

Across town, DuClaw Brewing Co. Is involved in a legal tussle of its own with Left Hand Brewing Co., filing suit in late March against the Colorado brewery for trademark infringement over the latter’s Sawtooth Ale and Black Jack Porter, now being distributed in Maryland by Legends Limited.

Left Hand introduced its brands first, but it didn’t enter the Maryland market until after DuClaw registered its Sawtooth and Black Jack trademarks for a Belgian white ale and stout, respectively. A 2010 cease-and-desist letter failed to resolve the dispute, and the case is now before Maryland U.S. District Court.

Ironically, Left Hand also finds itself in another trademark battle. It successfully trademarked the name “Nitro” for its milk stout, but the filing has since drawn retroactive protests from Guinness (quite predictably) along with Anheuser-Busch and Boston Beer Co.

In Silver Spring, Md., the incipient Citizens Brewing Co. Had to rename itself Denizens Brewing Co. After neighbor-to-the-south DC Brau (which markets a beer called The Citizen) protested.

You Don’t Own Your Name

Elsewhere, Ocean City, Md.-based Shorebilly Brewing Co. Changed its name to Backshore Brewing Co. In January after a trademark infringement lawsuit by a West Ocean City apparel-marketing firm that had trademarked the name “Shorebilly.” The fight nearly bankrupted the fledgling brewery’s owner, Danny Robinson.

Robinson’s efforts to rectify the situation starkly highlight the problem new beer marketers now face: Even after he held a contest to rename the boardwalk brewery, receiving over a thousand suggestions, he said he wasn’t able to use a single one because absolutely none was able to clear trademark hurdles.

“Until you go through it, you don’t realize how pretty much every word in the English language, somebody somewhere uses it for something,” Robinson said in an interview With the Salisbury Daily Times. “Even my own name. I said, ‘You know what? I’m just going to call it Robinson Brewing Co.’ And the lawyers are like, ‘No you’re not. There’s already one in existence.’”

Indeed, family names aren’t immune to such problems. One case garnering national publicity involves Schlafly Brewing Co. Of St. Louis, which in 2011 filed for trademarks in preparation for market expansion. The applications are being opposed by Tom’s aunt, the well-known conservative women’s activist Phyllis Schlafly, now 89; her son Andrew, a lawyer; and another son, Bruce, a surgeon in St. Louis.

"There are tens of millions of Americans who oppose alcohol," Andrew Schlafly told USA Today. “Certainly, alcohol has a connotation that is the opposite of conservative values."

Sometimes, there appears to be no rhyme or reason about who is targeted and why. The former Growlers Pub in southeast Baltimore, named for carryout beer containers, received a cease-and-desist letter from a three-outlet beer bar chain of the same name in the St. Louis, Mo. Area. The owners, John and Kristen Bates, immediately capitulated and changed the name to Baltimore Taphouse. “We don’t have the money to fight this,” John said at the time. Meanwhile, a similarly named brewpub, Growlers of Gaithersburg in the Maryland town of the same name, had no such issues with the Baltimore bar, nor did they ever receive a similar letter from the Missouri chain (which, by the way, closed its last location in June 2013).

Nice Guys Avoid Lawyers

Not all disputes end up in court. A decade ago, two western U.S. brewers, Colorado’s Avery Brewing Co. And California’s Russian River Brewing Co., discovered that each was brewing a beer called Salvation. Their response, beginning in 2006, was to market a collaborative blend of both beers that they named, in what would turn out to be a shrewd marketing gimmick, Collaboration Not Litigation.

But there is a danger in taking such a conciliatory approach, cautioned attorney Marc Sorini in a seminar (“Respectful and Distinct Branding”) at the 2014 Craft Brewers Conference in Denver. Such an approach “could almost be used as blackmail,” Sorini said. “I can force another brewery to align their brand with mine simply by infringing on their trademark. ‘If you don’t do a collaboration ale with me, you’re a jerk!’”

So what does a brewer do when seemingly every good animal name, and some not-sogood ones, has been taken, from aardvark to elephant to rhino to zebra, and almost every mountain range, geological feature, river and lake has been claimed?

One tactic is to choose especially creative, sometimes downright bizarre, names like Tactical Nuclear Penguin (a 32%-abv imperial stout from BrewDog in Scotland) or Purple Monkey Dishwasher (a chocolate peanut butter porter from Evil Genius Beer Co. In West Grove, Pa.).

The latter comes from a 1995 episode of The Simpsons, a reference to how a message can mutate to nonsense in transmission from one person to another.

Cartoon characters can’t sue, can they?

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Name+Shortage+Sparks+Litigation/1732330/212945/article.html.

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