Mid Atlantic Brewing News April/May 2014 : Page 1

BARNHOUSE BREWING Lickinghole Creek Craft Brewery owners Lisa and B Sean-Thomas S Pumphrey stand in front of their brewery, designed to look like a h horse barn typical of the Goochland County, VA area. PHOTO BY STEVE MARLER ILLUSTRATIONS BY: HANS GRANHEIM ILL US Story and photos by Steve Marler Sto By The Brews Brothers (Steve Frank & Arnold Meltzer) ILLUSTRATIONS BY: HANS GRANHEIM hat is a farm brewery? Would you include Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., the nation’s second largest craft brewer, with sales closing in on a million barrels a year? Sierra Nevada grows 30 acres of barley and eight acres of hops that it uses in its Estate Ale . Rogue Ales in Newport, Ore. probably makes the most farm-to-pint beers of any brewery in the nation, growing and floor-malting barley for its DIY beers, and also raising hops, rye, pumpkins, marionberries, jalapenos and honeybees. Normally, however, “farmhouse brewery” conjures up images of beer being made in a pastoral setting, with brewing being one of many income streams supporting the farm. Frey’s Brewing Co. in Frederick County, Md. would fit the bill. “My brewery is in an old milk shed and a barn,” says owner A See Farm p. 4 winery experience at a craft brewery. That’s what Lisa and Sean-Thomas Pumphrey hope to offer visitors at Lickinghole Creek Craft Brewery in rur Goochland County, Virginia, a rural 45-minute 45 drive west of Richmond. The brewery with a Belgian flair sits sit on a 221-acre farm where the Pumphreys Pu began growing hops five years ars ag “I was a homebrewer for a long ago. time tim and we had the property and an I wanted to do some fresh hop ho ales,” explained Sean-Thomas. Se Lisa, who wh studied wildlife wi biology, noted no that hops are a f fascinating crop because deer don’t d eat them and they don’t have to be fenced in. The Pumphreys use the hops, along with blackberries and broom grass, as edge habitat for a population p of bobwhite quail. “We “W get to combine both our passions, p my passion for brewing and Lisa’s passion for wildlife conservation,” boasted Sean-Thomas. T Hop H growing planted the seed for the 20-bbl brewhouse with four 40-bbl fermenters, which opened last September. The structure housing the brewery is designed to look like a Virginia horse barn. “We wanted to make it look like this building See Lickinghole p.5 INSIDE Book Review ................................. 8 Strengh Matters ............................ 9 Fairy Hopmother ........................10 Event Calendar ............................17 Homebrew ...................................12 Hop Ed .........................................25 NIPAC Crowns 2014 Winners .....28 Maps ...................................... 18-21 Virginia ...........14 C. Penn ............22 Philadelphia ...24 E. Penn ............26 State by State News W. Virginia ......28 Maryland ........29 Baltimore ........31 D.C. ..................33 New Jersey .....34 Delaware ........36

Back To The Farm

Steve Frank & Arnold Meltzer

What is a farm brewery?

Would you include Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., the nation’s second largest craft brewer, with sales closing in on a million barrels a year? Sierra Nevada grows 30 acres of barley and eight acres of hops that it uses in its Estate Ale.Rogue Ales in Newport, Ore. Probably makes the most farm-to-pint beers of Any brewery in the nation, growing and floormalting barley for its DIY beers, and also raising hops, rye, pumpkins, marionberries, jalapenos and honeybees.

Normally, however, “farmhouse brewery” conjures up images of beer being made in a pastoral setting, with brewing being one of many income streams supporting the farm. Frey’s Brewing Co. In Frederick County, Md. Would fit the bill. “My brewery is in an old milk shed and a barn,” says owner Adam Frey. He makes about 150 bbl a year with his 2-bbl brewhouse, and raises wheat, corn, beef, chickens and hops. His neighbor, Tom Barse of Mt. Airy’s Milkhouse Brewery at Stillpoint Farm, says, "A farm brewery is part of a farm, just like honeybees and sheep." Barse also grows hops, hay and wheat.

Most farm breweries in this nascent brewing niche are quite small, at most a step above nanobreweries, and quite new, opening in the past few years. They’re hoping to exploit a popular interest in buying local and in exploring terroir, that unique set of qualities that local geography and climate impart.

Some states are encouraging this trend, hoping to boost local agriculture, preserve struggling family farms from extinction, and promote agritourism.Maryland passed a bill in 2012 creating a Class 8 farmhouse brewery license; it grants holders many of the privileges available to farm wineries, including the ability to sell beer to go and apply for special-event permits. The law requires that some of the ingredients in the beer be grown on the farm, but doesn’t specify a percentage.

In February, the Virginia legislature passed SB 430, a bill that would allow farm breweries to operate as farm wineries do and prevent local governments from slapping further restrictions on their activities. The bill was awaiting Governor Terry McAuliffe’s signature as of press time.

The state already has a farm brewery in Lickinghole Creek Craft Brewery in Goochland, but the legislation could usher in a bumper crop of similar operations like Old 690 Brewing Co. In Hillsboro (set to open late this summer) and Dirt Farm Brewery in Bluemont in Loudoun County, which expects to begin brewing on a half-barrel system this fall.

In New Jersey, lawmakers last year considered S90, a bill that would have granted a farm brewery license to breweries engaged in agriculture and incorporating hops or some other homegrown ingredient in their beer. The bill was shunted aside in favor of a more comprehensive small brewery bill affecting the entire craft industry in the state.

In Pennsylvania, there currently are no legislative efforts to recognize farm breweries.However, several breweries have experimented with growing barley. They include Sprague Farm and Brew Works in Venango. Owners Brian and Minnie Sprague began brewing in 2006 and refurbished a century-old barn into a brewpub in 2009. They also grow hops on their 65-acre property and brew a tart, lemony saison called La Ferme.

In New York State, farm brewery legislation stipulates that 20% of the beer ingredients be grown in the state, with that percentage increasing in steps to 90 percent between 2018 and 2024. Within two years, the law has increased hop acreage from 15 to 200 acres. But it doesn’t actually require license holders to be on a farm.This has led to oxymorons like the Bronx’s Gun Hill Brewing Co. And Brooklyn’s Thousands Win, farm breweries in the heart of one of the most densely populated cities in the world. (The latter is experimenting with rooftop-grown hops.)

Virginia’s Dirt Farm Brewery should satisfy anybody’s definition, however. The Zurschmeide family, which will run the brewery, has been farming in the area for decades and owns both the Great Country Farms u-pick and the Bluemont Winery. They’re currently growing hops and expect to plant a test batch of barley in the fall.Beers will use a variety of produce from Great County Farms, including pumpkins, peaches, apples and blueberries. “We’re farmers by trade,” said Janell Zurschmeide.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Back+To+The+Farm/1678485/203849/article.html.

Lickinghole Creek

Steve Marler

A winery experience at a craft brewery.

That’s what Lisa and Sean- Thomas Pumphrey hope to offer visitors at Lickinghole Creek Craft Brewery in rural Goochland County, Virginia, a 45-minute drive west of Richmond.

The brewery with a Belgian flair sits on a 221-acre farm where the Pumphreys began growing hops five years ago. “I was a homebrewer for a long time and we had the property and I wanted to do some fresh hop ales,” explained Sean-Thomas. Lisa, who studied wildlife biology, noted that hops Fascinating crop because deer don’t eat them and they don’t have to be fenced in. The Pumphreys use the hops, along with blackberries and broom grass, as edge habitat for a population of bobwhite quail.We get to combine both our passions, my passion for brewing and Lisa’s passion for wildlife conservation,” boasted Sean- Thomas.

Hop growing planted the seed the 20-bbl brewhouse with four 40-bbl fermenters, which opened last September. The structure housing the brewery is designed to look like a Virginia horse barn. “We wanted to make it look like this building Has always been here,” relayed Sean-Thomas.He uses his homebrew system to conduct test batches. Once they decide on a recipe, brewer David Achkio scales it up for the larger system.

Goochland County is rich in history.Thomas Jefferson (a farmer-brewer himself) owned a small estate here that was burned by the British during the Revolutionary War.Goochland was also the site of fighting during the Civil War.

Local landmarks figure in the brewery and beer names. A waterway dubbed Little Lickinghole Creek runs through the property.Magic Beaver Belgian Style Pale Ale is named after the nearby Magic Beaver Pond. Short Pump Saison Virginia Farmhouse Ale, made with two types of rye, draws its name from the Short Pump Tavern, a colonial watering hole on the road connecting Richmond and Charlottesville. Three Chopt Tripel evokes a Native American trail marked by three notches on a tree.

Along with hops, the Pumphreys plan to grow other crops in 2014, such as barley (which they’ll malt at Copper Fox Distillery in Sperryville), pumpkins, blueberries, figs and sunflowers. Their “Simon & Garfunkel” herb garden will contain 80 herbs, including presumably parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme.Look for these to be featured in their Estate Series beers.

Bigger beers also figure into their marketing plans. March 1 saw the release of The Enlightened Despot, an 11.3%-abv Russian imperial stout aged for 100 days in 15-year-old Pappy Van Winkle barrels.Upcoming releases include the 11%-abv Goochland Quad on March 29 and 4 Pillars Imperial IPA on April 19.

Lickinghole Creek beers are available in kegs and in 750-ml bottles, with the bottles Traveling as far north as Arlington. All are bottle-conditioned. “It takes us an additional two weeks that we don’t get to send it to market,” notes Lisa. “But it adds that element of quality that we believe in.”

The brewery uses unfiltered well water for brewing and has its own treatment plant.Wastewater is purified and returned to the water table clean. The brewery donates a portion of each barrel sold to non-profits like the Center for Rural Culture and the Goochland Free Clinic and Family Services.

Sean-Thomas and Lisa both hail from the Richmond area, but got interested in craft beer while attending the University of Montana, drinking Moose Drool and other northwestern brands.The Pumphreys began seriously contemplating their own brewery in 2009.In 2011 they convinced Goochland County to allow farm breweries on agriculturally zoned land. The local ordinance limits them to producing 15,000 bbl a year.They plan to brew 1,800 bbl in 2014.

The Pumphreys are ardent backers of SB 430, a bill that would define “farm brewery” in the Old Dominion and ease restrictions on their operation. “It would allow my wife and I to build a house on the same lot where the brewery is,” explained Sean. It would also expand the areas on the property where visitors could sip a beer – they could enjoy a pint while touring the hop field, for instance.It might also enable the Pumphreys to expand the parking lot without being legally required to blacktop the entire area. “It would destroy the atmosphere, having a mile-long paved road,” said Sean.

Lickinghole Creek Craft Brewery lies on a gravel road at 4100 Knolls Point Drive in Goochland, Va. The tasting room is open to 3-6 p.m. on Friday and 12 noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Lickinghole+Creek/1678486/203849/article.html.

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