Mid Atlantic Brewing News August/September 2013 : Page 1

GOING NUTS. Getting ready to pour a snifter of Peanut Butter Cup Coffee Porter at PHOTO BY VAL CLARK the Willoughby Brewing Co. booth at SAVOR. By Greg Kitsock Let’s get the jokes out of the way. Yes, it pours as well as any other beer. No, it won’t stick to the roof of f your mouth. nut The jury is out on whether peanut butter ales are a short-lived fad or a new style on the upswing, like pumpkin beers were 10-15 years ago. But the early reports are encouraging. “Of all in-house sales, it’s probably by far our most popular,” says brewer Mark Braunwarth of Marley’s Brewery & Grille in Bloomsburg, Pa., in regard to his Pack Dog Peanut anut Butter Ale . His customers drained 16 barrels in a little over a month … and this with nine other beers on tap. And DuClaw Brewing Co. in Baltimore County, Md. has promoted its peanut nut butter porter – dubbed Sweet Baby Jesus! ! – to a year-round product in 12-oz bottles s and kegs. The beer, based on a recipe ipe by homebrewers Tom Huckestein and Dave DeLeo, was the winner in the brewery’s first H.E.R.O. homebrew competition in 2011. Sales continue to soar in spite of the summer heat, reports brewmaster Jim Wagner. We use pure chocolate extract and “We a uniq unique peanut butter extract that contai contains no nut or legume allergens, so everyone eve can enjoy this beer,” he notes. As for the name, “[We] felt it was quite fitting considering the reaction one has when trying it for the first time!” said Wagner. He admits that there have been a few complaints, but insists that “by far we have rec received more positive comments th negative!” than Probably the first brewer to attempt this style was Keith V of MillerCoors’ specialty Villa d division Blue Moon Brewing C who scraped out jars of Co., P Peter Pan, Skippy and other br brands to create his Peanut Bu Butter Ale at Denver’s SandLot Br Brewery in the mid-1990s. A Dog fi sh Head owner Sam Calagione (l) and Shamus Jones, proprietor of Brooklyn Brine (maker of the Hop-Pickle), share a beer at June's SAVOR PHOTO BY VAL CLARK beer and food extravaganza in New York City. Below-Paul Bunyan’s Lunchbox, a food truck parked outside Dog fi sh Head Craft Brewery in Milton, Del., will serve as the test kitchen for the brewery’s “beer-centric” cuisine. PHOTO COURTESY OF DOGFISH HEAD By Alexander D. Mitchell IV t wasn't enough for Dogfish Head to kick off a $51 million expansion at their Milton, Del. facility, installing more and larger brewing vessels and a new gift shop and bar. They had to add a food truck, too. lly, The truck (actually, it’s a large trailer) is s dubbed "Bunyan's Lunchbox" after the legendary lumberman. It’s the centerpiece for Project Bunyan, Dogfish Head’s foray into the specialty food business. Since May 31, it’s been serving up a selection of I bratwursts and Italian sausages seasoned with Dogfish beers and cooked on a wood-fired grill, as well as two other examples of Dogfish Head’s “beer-centric” foods: Hop-Pickles and Hard-Tack Clam Chowder. The trailer sits outside a doorway from a seating area behind the new bar. It’s staffed employees, who take by cross-trained brewery employee are plans to turns at serving the public. There ar occasionally take the trailer out on the road o other events, to festivals and oth and eventually, to market “beer-centric” some of the “bee nationwide. foods nationwid brats” are The “beer br over a year of the result of ov R&D involving Dogfish Head and Hea the Original Brat Hans, Br division a d See Peanut Butter p. 4 See C Cuisine p. 4 INSIDE Brew Act, Beer Act ........................ 5 Book Review.................................. 8 Matters of Import .......................10 Homebrew ...................................12 Hop Ed .........................................17 Maps ...................................... 18-21 Fairy Hopmother ........................38 Event Calendar ............................39 Virginia ...........14 C. Penn ............22 Philadelphia ...24 E. Penn ............26 State by State News Maryland ........27 Baltimore ........30 W. Virginia ......32 D.C. ..................33 New Jersey .....34 Delaware ........36

Peanut Butter Beer

Greg Kitsock

Spread of a New Style

Let’s get the jokes out of the way.

Yes, it pours as well as any other beer.

No, it won’t stick to the roof of mouth.

The jury is out on whether peanut butter ales are a short-lived fad or a new style on the upswing, like pumpkin beers were 10-15 years ago. But the early reports are encouraging.

“Of all in-house sales, it’s probably by far our most popular,” says brewer Mark Braunwarth of Marley’s Brewery & Grille in Bloomsburg, Pa., in regard to his Pack Dog Peanut Butter Ale. His customers drained barrels in a little over a month … this with nine other beers on tap.

And DuClaw Brewing Co. In County, Md. Has promoted its peanut porter – dubbed Sweet Baby Jesus! Year-round product in 12-oz bottles and kegs. The beer, based on a recipe by homebrewers Tom Huckestein and Dave DeLeo, was the winner the brewery’s first H.E.R.O. homebrew competition in 2011. Sales continue to soar in spite of the summer heat, reports brewmaster Jim Wagner.

“use pure chocolate extract and unique peanut butter extract that contains no nut or legume allergens, everyone can enjoy this beer,” he

As for the name, “[We] felt it was fitting considering the reaction when trying it for the first said Wagner. He admits that have been a few complaints, insists that “by far we have received more positive comments than negative!”

Probably the first brewer attempt this style was Keith Villa of MillerCoors’ specialty division Blue Moon Brewing Co., who scraped out jars of Peter Pan, Skippy and other brands to create his Peanut Butter Ale at Denver’s SandLot Brewery in the mid-1990s. A Typical response back then, Villa later recalled, was, “It’s not as disgusting as I thought it would be,” but the beer went on to score a hit at the Great American Beer Festival.

This year’s SAVOR beer-and-food festival in New York City featured two peanut butter beers. Big Gruesome Chocolate Peanut Butter Stout is “hands-down our best seller,” says brewer Rob Tarves of Spring House Brewing Co. In Conestoga, Pa. He admits that he doesn’t use actual peanut butter in the 8.1%- abv imperial stout (“because of the fat content, it wouldn’t have a head”). But otherwise he’s tightlipped about the recipe. “I think my boss would sue me if it got into print.”

Big Gruesome has been a regular offering since last January. It’s available in kegs and 22-oz bottles at the Spring House Taproom in center-city Lancaster and at the brewery’s wholesalers in Harrisburg, Philadelphia Reading and York. Spring House, adds Tarves, also brews a PBJ beer called Little Gruesome that incorporates 75 lb of fresh blueberries, blackberries and strawberries per 12-bbl batch.

At SAVOR, Big Gruesome was paired with a spicy chicken taco in mole sauce. Slightly sweeter, and matched up with a black-and-tan brownie, was the Peanut Butter Cup Coffee Porter from Willoughby Brewing Co. In the town of Willoughby in northeastern Ohio. “We use a careful malt selection and we also add some peanut butter and chocolate flavors and some roasted coffee,” says Rick Seibt, head of operations for the 15-year-old brewpub. At 5.5% abv, it “has an intense aroma but is really well balanced,” comments Seibt. “It’s something we have to have on at all times. If we don’t, I get yelled at!”

Most peanut butter beers use a porter or stout as a base, making use of the chocolaty overtones of the highly roasted malts. Nothing goes better with peanut butter than chocolate, right? The odd man out is Marley’s brewpub’s Pack Dog. Brewer Mark Braunwarth starts out with a copper-colored ale (6.2% abv) with a light caramel flavor and minimal hopping. Braunwarth adds PB2, a powdered peanut butter from Bell Plantation in Tifton, Ga. It takes him 45 minutes, he says, to empty out 50 lb into an 8-bbl batch of beer.

“It changes every time he brews it,” comments the young woman who answers the phone, before connecting me with Braunwarth. “It doesn’t taste like Jiff. It has more of a roasted peanut flavor.”

Braunwarth doesn’t think the idea of a peanut butter beer is so far out. “They’ve been serving peanuts with beer for a long, long time. Why not put the two of them together?”

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Peanut+Butter+Beer/1477342/170849/article.html.

No Dessert

Alexander D. Mitchell IV

EAT YOUR BREW: DOGFISH HEAD'S BEER-CENTRIC CUISINE

Dogfish Head owner Sam Calagione (l) and Shamus Jones, proprietor of Brooklyn Brine (maker of the Hop-Pickle), share a beer at June's SAVOR beer and food extravaganza in New York City. PHOTO BY VAL CLARK Below- Paul Bunyan’s Lunchbox, a food truck parked outside Dogfish Head Craft Brewery in Milton, Del., will serve as the test kitchen for the brewery’s “beer-centric” cuisine.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DOGFISH HEAD

It wasn't enough for Dogfish Head to kick off a $51 million expansion at their Milton, Del. Facility, installing more and larger brewing vessels and a new gift shop and bar. They had to add a food truck, too.

The truck (actually, it’s a large trailer) is dubbed "Bunyan's Lunchbox" after the legendary lumberman. It’s the centerpiece for Project Bunyan, Dogfish Head’s foray into the specialty food business. Since May 31, it’s been serving up a selection of bratwursts and Italian sausages seasoned with Dogfish beers and cooked on a wood-fired grill, as well as two other examples of Dogfish Head’s “beer-centric” foods: Hop-Pickles and Hard-Tack Clam Chowder.

The trailer sits outside a doorway from a seating area behind the new bar. It’s staffed by cross-trained brewery employees, who take turns at serving the public. There are plans to take the trailer out on the road occasionally to festivals and other events, and eventually, to market some of the “beer-centric” foods nationwide.

The “beer brats” are the result of over a year of R&D involving Dogfish Head and the Original Brat Hans, a division of Perdue based in Salisbury, Md. The four sausages that made the grade are: the classic bratwurst, flavored with Sam’s dark Belgianstyle ale Raison d’Etre; the Heirloom Italian Brat with the beer/mead hybrid Midas Touch; the Greek Feta Brat, also with Midas Touch; and the Spicy Espresso Brat, combining espresso powder, cumin, habanero pepper and Chicory Stout.

The wursts were expected to join the menu at the three Dogfish Head Alehouses in July, and to pop up in specialty food marts from New York City to Virginia by late summer.

Cider Brine and Hardtack

The Hop-Pickles (first mentioned in MABN a year ago) are a joint project between the brewery and Brooklyn Brine in New York City. They’re marinated in a brine made from apple cider vinegar and laced with 60 Minute IPA. Calagione ships it in 200-gallon stainless steel containers; the beer is “denatured” (rendered unfit to drink by lacing it with salt) so Dogfish Head isn’t liable for alcoholic beverage taxes.

The pickles cost $8 for a 16-oz jar via the Dogfish website, a little more if you buy them through specialty stores. Or you can pay $2 for a serving of slices at the Milton food truck.

The Hard-Tack Chowder is made by Sea Watch International, a family-owned clam harvester in Easton, Md. According to Guy Simmons, Sea Watch’s vice president of marketing and product development, 60 Minute IPA is added to a broth containing clams, potatoes, onions and salt pork.

There’s one other significant ingredient: crumbled-up hardtack. Hardtack is a kind of cracker, baked from flour and water, that was once standard ration in the nineteenth-century military because it remained edible for such a long time. It’s practically disappeared from the modern market, says Simmons, except for small batches made for more zealous Civil War reenactors. Calagione came up with the idea of duplicating a recipe found in Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, where the author writes of a chowder “made of small juicy clams, scarcely bigger than hazelnuts, mixed with pounded ship’s biscuit, and salted pork cut up into little flakes.”

Hard-Tack Chowder costs $4 for a 15-oz can. According to the directions, you reconstitute it by adding 8 oz of half-andhalf plus 3 oz of the brewery’s wood-aged brown ale Palo Santo Marron. Simmering the chowder at 160-170 degrees F “does eliminate at least some of the alcohol, but I’m not the expert to say how much,” cautions Simmons.

Shamus Jones, owner of Brooklyn Brine, and Chad Clem, innovation manager for Perdue’s specialty division Coleman Natural Foods, assure that their products are nonalcoholic. “Nobody’s getting a buzz off our sausages,” assures Clem.

Buy Local, Eat Local

Although the project might seem at first glance to be just another marketing venture and money-maker, there is actually more than might initially meet the eye, says Dogfish Head tour manager Kelly Sharp.

"We've always had beer-centric foods in the brewpub. Now we're thinking outside the box in terms of beer ingredients in food, what with the tremendous growth in craft beer," said Sharp. "We definitely plan to grow the food line over time, and just as the brewpub was always a test kitchen for the beers, we are using the food truck to get feedback on the food products. We don't want to cannibalize the brewpub and Alehouses, however."

Using ingredients from independent local producers is a major component of Project Bunyan. The Delmarva-made sausages are served on locally-made buns made in part with malt extract and spent grain; special condiments, such as beet ketchup and mustards, are being made at the company's original brewpub in Rehoboth Beach. A partnership with a local orchard, Fifer Orchards of Camden, Del., will offer a monthly Farm-to-Brat Relish; the first one was made with Delaware strawberries, onions, Delaware honey and mint.

Meanwhile, The Dogfish Alehouses in Gaithersburg, Md. And Fairfax and Falls Church, Va. Will serve the beer brats on a pretzel roll specially made at a Washington, DC bakery, says partner Joe Hospital.

Local and unique are the keywords of Calagione’s business strategy. The press release announcing Project Bunyan reads, “If Dogfish Head is to have lasting meaning and lasting distinction in an increasingly challenging beer industry, where foreigncompanies continue to gobble up market share, we need to focus more on local, on human scale, on resources that come from the mid- Atlantic region and on things that haven't been done before.”

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/No+Dessert+/1477345/170849/article.html.

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