Mid Atlantic Brewing News June/July 2012 : Page 1

These Beers Don’t Need GLUTEN? No Stinkin’ Stinkin’ Gluten Gluten No Susquehanna Ale Trail By Jack Curtin By Greg Kitsock n estimated 1 in 133 Americans can’t drink a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale or Sam Adams Boston Lager or even a Miller Lite without doing their body serious harm. They suffer from celiac disease, a disorder in which common brewing grains provoke the body’s immune system into attacking the digestive track. The culprit is gluten, an aggregate of gummy proteins found in barley, wheat and rye. ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM A Fortunately, Mother Nature is generous in providing fermentables. If you can’t make beer from barley, you can always use sorghum, rice, millet, buckwheat or tapioca. Brewers have used all of these (primarily sorghum) in making beer safe for celiacs, beginning about five years ago with brands like Lakefront Brewery’s New Grist ; See Gluten p. 9 Hop Ed ........................................... 3 Book Review.................................. 5 Homebrew ...................................10 Fairy Hopmother ........................12 Matters of Import .......................13 Maps ...................................... 18-21 Brewhaha ....................................35 Event Calendar ............................39 INSIDE State by State News Virginia ...........14 C. Penn ............22 Philadelphia ...24 E. Penn ............26 Maryland ........27 Baltimore ........30 W. Virginia ......32 D.C. ..................33 New Jersey .....34 Delaware ........36 The Susquehanna Ale T Trail, Trai a craft brewing promotional effort to suppor support cr received a in Central l Pennsylvania, has rec solid thumbs mbs up fr from the seven venues that inaugural event.Mudhook were part of the in event Taproom and Mr. Brewing Co., Goo Good Dog Taproo Supply in Steve’s Homebrew & Wine Sup Brewery, Stoudt’s York; Bube’s be’s Brewer Brew Lancaster Brewing Co. o. and L Lan Lancaster Brewing Co, in La Lanc Brewing County; and nd Tröeg Tröegs B Co. in Dauphin County all estimated that anywhere from 100 to 250 or more Ale Trail travelers visited their businesses during the two weekends that launched the project. The York County Convention and Visitors Bureau (YCVB) created the new venture based upon the successful UnCork York Wine Trail that it launched in 2005, which became the Mason Dixon Wine Trail when two Maryland wineries joined. Like the Wine Trail, the T COURTESY OF F YCVB Draws First Beer Tourists ILLUSTRATION BY: HANS GRANHEIM If you drop by Lancaster Brewing Co. along the Susquehanna Ale Trail, you might catch Bill Moore brewing a batch of Milk Stout or Amish Four Grain Ale. PHOTO e b Ale Trail is a year-round, self-guided attraction. Its debut on April 13-15 and April 20-22 offered beer tourists a $10 “passport” available online or at one of the participating businesses. Anyone with a passport stamped by at least four of those venues was rewarded with an official Susquehanna Ale Trail beer mug. They enjoyed guided tours, beer samples and special discounts at each location on both weekends. Bill Moore, brewmaster at Lancaster Brewing, commented, “Those two weekends were a huge win for us. Although there was no requirement for anyone to buy anything, we saw significant increases in sales of food and beer, even glassware. … The only negative remarks were that they wished more breweries were involved.” He said that being listed in YCVB’s widely distributed annual visitor guide (225,000 copies across the state) was worth the $250 See Ale Trail p 6

Gllutteen?

Greg Kitsock

Tthheessee Bbeeeerrss Ddoonn’’tt Nneeeedd No Stinkin’ Gluten

An estimated 1 in 133 Americans can’t drink a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale or Sam Adams Boston Lager or even a Miller Lite without doing their body serious harm. They suffer from celiac disease, a disorder in which common brewing grains provoke the body’s immune system into attacking the digestive track. The culprit is gluten, an aggregate of gummy proteins found in barley, wheat and rye.

Fortunately, Mother Nature is generous in providing fermentables. If you can’t make beer from barley, you can always use sorghum, rice, millet, buckwheat or tapioca. Brewers have used all of these (primarily sorghum) in making beer safe for celiacs, beginning about five years ago with brands like Lakefront Brewery’s New Grist; Anheuser-Busch’s Redbridge; and Bard’s Tale The Original Sorghum Malt Beer.

Now the pace has accelerated, with gluten-free beers that go beyond pastiches of pale ale and amber lager, and companies dedicated to brewing barley-less beer. (like New Planet Beer Co. In Boulder, Colo., and Portland, Ore. Microbrewery Harvester Brewing Co., which makes ale from groundup chestnuts) Both the Great American Beer Festival and the World Beer Cup have gluten-free categories.

Beer From Bees and Berries

Sam Calagione, president of the Dogfish Head Craft Brewery in Milton, Del., isn’t a celiac, but he does read his email and greenlighted Tweason’ale after reading the requests of drinkers who wanted a “gluten-free beer with gusto.” Tweason’ale is fermented from sorghum syrup and a dark wildflower honey, and flavored with strawberries that the brewery mashes in a wood press. It’s got a brisk effervescence and a subtle, sweet-tart fruitiness. The honey, added to the brew kettle near the end of the boil, adds a floral aroma but not so much in the way of sweetness or body. Tweason’ale is light on the palate, and at 6% abv, moderate in strength.

In one respect Tweason’ale is atypical for Dogfish Head beers - it’s very lightly hopped, “a couple handfuls into the 100-barrel kettle,” according to Calagione/

The six-pack holder, designed by Marq Spusta, shows the courtship of an anthropomorphic strawberry and a bee. It’s designed so retailers can rotate the package so the correct season is facing outward. Calagione plans to market Tweason’ale four times a year, in the intervals between Dogfish seasonal releases. The brand should have reemerged by the time this issue appears in early June.

Many gluten-free beers finish with a cidery twang, a taste that some drinkers equate with “Belgian.” The Green’s line, brewed at the DeProef Brewery in Lochristi, Belgium, is actually fermented with a Belgian yeast strain from a blend of millet, buckwheat, rice and sorghum. Merchant du Vin of Tukwila, Wash. Imports three brands, including Endeavor Dubbel Dark Ale (7 percent alcohol by volume), with its sweet, roasty, molasses-like notes, and Green’s Tripel Blonde Ale (8.5 percent alcohol), with spicy and fruity nuances.

The labels for the Dubbel, the Tripel and Amber Ale guarantee that besides barley and wheat, the beers contain no “crustaceans, eggs, fish, peanuts … nuts, celery, mustard, sesame seeds, sulphur dioxide and sulphites.”

Crustaceans in a beer? Are they pulling our leg? Craig Hartinger, marketing director for Merchant du Vin, states that the Food and Drug Administration doesn’t require this language, but adds, “I’ve had people with serious allergies say, ‘It’s great to have this on the label.’”

Gluten-Free at the Taps

You won’t see many gluten-free beers in draft form, due to safety issues. A careless bartender could serve a customer the wrong beer. Or he could contaminate the beer by running it through a draft line that had a few drops of a barley-based brew clinging to it.

At the Rock Bottom Brewery in Arlington, Va., head brewer Dave Warwick labors mere feet from the draft tower and can make sure his Nikki’s Gluten Free Honey Pale Ale, brewed with sorghum, brown rice, locally produced honey and Cascade and Centennial hops, is served from a dedicated tap. It’s named after one of Warwick’s friends, who became sick after drinking his Jazzberry Raspberry last June … and learned that the cause wasn’t a hangover but gluten intolerance.

Nikki’s has a delicate floral aroma and reminds one initially of an ordinary pale ale; not until your beer warms up do you notice the sorghum. So far the Arlington Rock Bottom is the chain’s only branch making such a beer.

Warwick runs through a half-barrel a week, making it his slowest-selling beer. “But it’s drawn in new regulars,” he adds, along with friends who happily down Rock Bottom’s other beers.

Deglutenizing Barley

But the ultimate goal of a gluten-free brewer would be to make a beer that appeals to celiacs and non-celiacs alike.

Terry Michaelson would agree. “Beer in our society is a connector, something for sitting down with friends and laughing and sharing,” said Michaelson, CEO of the Craft Brew Alliance based in Portland, Ore., who was diagnosed with celiac disease 12 years ago. Recently, he and brewmaster Joe Casey of Widmer Brothers Brewing Co. (whose wife is a celiac) released Omission Gluten Free Lager and Pale Ale, made with barley that has most of the gluten removed through a proprietary brewing process.

The golden lager is crisp and refreshing, with a lemony hop character. The ambercolored ale is full of resiny hops and caramel malt. Neither has any peculiar twang or funk that would set it apart.

But they’re available only in Oregon. Michaelson can’t go nationwide because of regulatory hurdles.

Beer made without barley doesn’t fit the federal government’s definition of “malt beverage,” and oversight defaults to the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA allows breweries to label these beers “gluten-free” if they contain fewer than 20 parts per million of gluten.

Omission beers claim only six ppm or fewer. But to ship a barley-based beer across state lines, claims Michaelson, the brewery needs approval from another agency, the Tax and Trade Bureau. The TTB hasn’t yet issued guidelines for stating gluten content, says Tom Hogue, director for Congressional and public affairs.

“We’re working to get something out as quickly as we can,” he promises.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Gllutteen%3F/1087737/114978/article.html.

Suasqehanna Leu Trail

Jack Curtin

Draws First Beer Tourists

If you drop by Lancaster Brewing Co. Along the Susquehanna Ale Trail, you might catch Bill Moore brewing a batch of Milk Stout or Amish Four Grain Ale. PHOTO COURTESY OF YCVB

The Susquehanna Ale Trail, a promotional effort to support craft brewing in Central Pennsylvania, has received a solid thumbs up from the seven venues that were part of the inaugural event.Mudhook Brewing Co., Good Dog Taproom and Mr. Steve’s Homebrew & Wine Supply in York; Bube’s Brewery, Stoudt’s Brewing Co. And Lancaster Brewing Co, in Lancaster County; and Tröegs Brewing Co. In Dauphin County all estimated that anywhere from 100 to 250 or more Ale Trail travelers visited their businesses during the two weekends that launched the project.

The York County Convention and Visitors Bureau (YCVB) created the new venture based upon the successful UnCork York Wine Trail that it launched in 2005, which became the Mason Dixon Wine Trail when two Maryland wineries joined.

Like the Wine Trail, the Ale Trail is a year-round, self-guided attraction. Its debut on April 13-15 and April 20-22 offered beer tourists a $10 “passport” available online or at one of the participating businesses. Anyone with a passport stamped by at least four of those venues was rewarded with an official Susquehanna Ale Trail beer mug. They enjoyed guided tours, beer samples and special discounts at each location on both weekends.

Bill Moore, brewmaster at Lancaster Brewing, commented, “Those two weekends were a huge win for us. Although there was no requirement for anyone to buy anything, we saw significant increases in sales of food and beer, even glassware. … The only negative remarks were that they wished more breweries were involved.” He said that being listed in YCVB’s widely distributed annual visitor guide (225,000 copies across the state) was worth the $250 Mmembership fee all by itself. “They’re trying to drive tourist business to us, new people we’d maybe never see otherwise, and I am really grateful for that.”

Bube’s head brewer Rick Kunkel admits he had his doubts originally. “To be honest, with the price of gas today, I wasn’t sure how this was going to go. We prepped for it, though; adding extra staff and making sure we had a tour guide and the brewers on hand. And then the crowds rolled in. I talked to a number of them who had never been to Bube’s before. Everybody seemed happy and enthused and they were looking forward to hitting all the places on the trail.”

Likewise, Stoudt’s Eddie Stoudt commented, “We had a couple hundred people come and visit us who maybe wouldn’t have done so if there wasn’t for the Ale Trail.” Tröegs’ Matt Trogner noted that the event drew a lot of Hershey residents who had visited their old brewery in Harrisburg but had never made it to the new one. “I think the fact that the Ale Trail weekends were more organized and designed to be a bigger experience is what got them motivated to come out. We encouraged people to come early and take the self guided tour path and then we did several tutored tastings in our barrel-aging room with John Kaufman, our special events coordinator.”

New kid on the block, Mudhook Brewing Co. In downtown York, had a similar experience. Kate Wheeler handles PR for Mudhook, which her husband and her father opened last July. “We saw a significant spike in the number of people who came over both weekends, and a lot of them- even some who live right here in York County - didn’t even know we were here.” Husband Tim, the brewer, was a “one-man band,” she adds. “Tim spent five solid hours each day doing tours and tastings with no break so we realize that we will have to schedule tours for specific times in the future to take some of the pressure off.”

Even newer than Mudhook, so new it wasn’t even finished yet in April (it should be opening right about now), is the Good Dog Taproom. Owner Scott Eden says the chance to preview the business was invaluable. “I was stunned by the number of people who came in, a couple of hundred of them over the two weekends. This was still basically a construction zone, with people painting and putting up drywall, but everybody made the best of it. I had a couple of kegs tapped and poured samples for them and tried to give them some idea of what the Good Dog will be like.”

Mr. Steve’s Homebrew & Wine Supply was the oldest business of the seven aside from Stoudt’s; the York location opened in 1993 and there are also stores in Lancaster and Camp Hill. Owner Steve Stoppard stayed open two extra hours one Friday night to accommodate two carloads of Ale Trail followers who were running late. “Everybody hung around and talked and sampled our homebrews. And when I mentioned we had wine samples on the other side of the store, they jumped on that too.”

Having a homebrew shop on the tour added a special touch, says YCVB spokesperson Rob Mayer. “As much as people enjoy drinking good beer, they also really take great pleasure in learning about how to make it. There’s a big educational opportunity there.” Mayer added, “We expect more breweries to sign on once they see how well the initial weekends went and we will be looking to enhance the experience in any way that we can, including adding a lodging component to attract more overnight visitors to the region. We see this as being an ideal getaway weekend trip for real beer lovers.”

For more information, check out http://susquehannaaletrail.com.

Read the full article at http://mabnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Suasqehanna+Leu+Trail/1087748/114978/article.html.

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